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3 matches found for wool in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 3 of 3

  1. 100% Agricultural Alternatives: Feeder Lamb Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Feeder lamb production is a livestock enterprise adaptableto small-scale and part-time farms in Pennsylvania. Feederlambs are purchased as premarket-weight lambs, fed to adesirable market weight, and then sold. When purchased,lambs can weigh as little as 35 pounds or less and as muchas 60 pounds. These lambs are usually marketed at 110pounds through local auctions, slaughterhouses, brokers,and individuals. In recent years, direct markets, nichemarkets, tel-a-auctions, and marketing cooperatives havebecome popular for selling lambs. The wool is sold throughlocal and national markets, brokers, and wool cooperatives."

  2. 98% Ag Alternatives: Rabbit Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Rabbit farming has grown from raising a few rabbits forfamily consumption to large commercial operations withhundreds of rabbits. Approximately 200,000 producersmarket 6 to 8 million rabbits annually in the United States,where 8 to 10 million pounds of rabbit meat are consumedeach year. Laboratories use nearly 600,000 rabbits a year for medical experiments and new product testing. On theinternational market, nearly 10,000 tons of Angora wool areconsumed annually."

  3. 97% Agricultural Alternatives: Milking Sheep Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Sheep products in Pennsylvania do not have to be limited tomeat and wool. There is a growing interest in milking sheepand sheep milk products. In Europe, sheep dairying is afairly common enterprise, and sheep breeds have beendeveloped specifically for milk production. It is not unusual for these breeds to average four to seven pounds of milk daily. The European breeds, however, are not available in the United States because of import restrictions. Sheep breeds common to Pennsylvania average between .75 and 2.0 pounds of milk daily. This requires U.S. sheep producers interested in dairying to carefully select ewes based on milk production and durability. Crossbred ewes produce more milk and are more durable than some purebreds."

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