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64 matches found for unangst tree farm in Extension Publications

Results 31 - 40 of 64

  1. 43% Feeding the Newborn Dairy Calf [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Calf health, growth, and productivity rely heavily on nutrition and management practices. Every heifer calf born on a dairy farm represents an opportunity to maintain or increase herd size, to improve the herd genetically, or to improve economic returns to the farm. The objectives of raising the newborn calf to weaning age are optimizing growth and minimizing health problems. To accomplish these goals, it is necessary to understand the calf?s digestive and immune systems, her nutrient needs, and the feed options available to meet those needs."

  2. 43% Procedures for Tattooing Market Hogs [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "The United States Department of Agriculture is requiring meat processors to maintain unique identity and the farm of origin for all show pigs purchased for slaughter. Hatfield Quality Meats has been a strong supporter of Pennsylvania?s county fairs and the Pennsylvania Farm Show and will continue to support the youth exhibitors at these events. In order to comply with the USDA directive, Hatfield now requires that all show hogs be uniquely tattooed before they are transported to the processing plant."

  3. 43% Troubleshooting milk flavor problems [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Covers farm related areas that can contribute to milk flavor problems. Topics include classification of off-flavors, rancid flavor, farm oxidized flavor, feed flavor, unclean flavor, malty, high acid and putrid."

  4. 39% Agronomy Facts 54: Pennsylvania's Nutrient Management Act: Who Will Be Affected? [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "In the spring of 1993, the Pennsylvania legislature passed and the governor signed the Nutrient Management Act into law. Before this legislation was passed, problems with nutrient pollution were administered under the Clean Streams Law, which dealt only with surface waters. This existing law stated that if a farmer follows practices in the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) publication (Manure Manual), no special permits or approvals are required for manure utilization on farms. The Nutrient Management Act is the first law in Pennsylvania that requires regulatory oversight of nutrient plans on certain farms. This law oversight of nutrient plans on certain farms. This law will take effect on October 1, 1997. An important question is, who will be affected by this legislation?"

  5. 39% Avoiding Soil Compaction [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Twenty-first-century farm economics stimulate farmers to increase the size of their operations. To improve labor efficiency, farm equipment usually increases in size. Tractors, combines, forage harvesters, grain and forage wagons, manure spreaders, and lime trucks are all bigger than they used to be. Twenty years ago, for example, 2.5-ton box-type manure spreaders were common in Pennsylvania, whereas today liquid manure spreaders may weigh 20 or 30 tons. The increasing size of farm equipment may cause significant soil compaction that can negatively affect soil productivity as well as environmental quality. This fact sheet focuses on ways to avoid soil compaction."

  6. 34% Can Culling be Controlled in the Expanding Dairy Farm? [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "For the expanding dairy farm, culling is a very important issue that can impact the success of the expansion and business profitability and viability. Understanding how expansion impacts voluntary and involuntary culling beforehand is essential as the manager then has the opportunity to adjust and adopt management practices."

  7. 31% Agronomy Facts 63: Diagnosing Soil Compaction using a Penetrometer (soil compaction tester)
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil compaction is a serious concern for farmers in Pennsylvania. Soil compaction can easily reduce crop yields by 10 percent, and can lead to water and soil quality degradation due to increased runoff and soil structure destruction. The continuous consolidation of farms means that herds are growing, more forage is harvested per farm, more manure is being produced, larger equipment is used to spread manure and harvest and transport forages and grain, and the opportunity to tailor field operations to optimum soil conditions for traffic is decreasing. Compaction is therefore an issue that will likely increase in importance in the years to come."

  8. 31% Agricultural Alternatives: Swine Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Technological change and vertical integration in the swineindustry have resulted in fewer farms producing recordamounts of pork. The number of operators involved in swineproduction in Pennsylvania fell from 20,000 at the beginningof 1981 to 3,456 in 1997. Pennsylvania remains animportant swine producer with market value of sales rankingit 12th in the country. Approximately 70 percent of Pennsylvania swine operations produce less than 100 head per year, and only 2.8 percent produce more than 1,000 head per year. While the trend in the swine industry continues towards larger farms, opportunities remain to make money by raising hogs in a part-time enterprise."

  9. 29% Agronomy Facts 16: Nutrient Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The economics of nutrient management are clear. Manage plant nutrients for maximum economic benefit to the farmer. That is an easy concept to accept. Profit is the bottom line in farming, as in any business."

  10. 29% Agronomy Facts 18: Corn silage production and management
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Corn harvested for silage is an important feed crop on most Pennsylvania farms, where cropland often is limited. The crop provides livestock producers with a high-yielding, relatively consistent source of forage and the animals with a highly digestible and palatable feed. Corn silage produces more energy per acre than any other crop grown in Pennsylvania."

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