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182 matches found for soil consulting in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 10 of 182

  1. 100% Liming Turfgrass Areas
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Liming is the practice of applying an agent to reduce soil acidity (raise pH) and make soils more favorable for turfgrass growth. Raising soil pH requires a quantity of liming material that is determined by the degree of soil acidity as well as the quality and type of liming material. Soil acidity is determined by a soil test, however, not all soil tests provide accurate information on how much lime should be applied. Most university and commercial laboratories will provide sound recommendations of how much lime needs to be applied to turfgrass areas."

  2. 97% Effects of Soil Compaction [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil compaction is the reduction of soil volume due to external factors; this reduction lowers soil productivity and environmental quality. The threat of soil compaction is greater today than in the past because of the dramatic increase in the size of farm equipment. Therefore, producers must pay more attention to soil compaction than they have in the past. In this fact sheet we will discuss the effects of soil compaction and briefly identify ways to avoid or alleviate it."

  3. 92% Agronomy Facts 31A: Soil fertility management for forage crops Pre-establishment [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil fertility management for forage crops is a continuous process that begins well before the forage crop is established. In the pre-establishment phase the soil conditions are adjusted to provide optimum soil fertility when the crop is established. At establishment the fertility program should deal with any last-minute small adjustments in soil fertility and any requirements for getting the plants established, such as a starter fertilizer. Finally, once the crop is established the fertility program focuses on maintaining good soil fertility levels for the life of the forage stand."

  4. 92% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 11: Soil Conservation Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil conservation protects a valuable resource and reduces the off-farm direct impacts of sediment or the indirect impacts of nutrients or pesticides that may be attached to eroded soil particles. A good soil management program has three goals: to protect the soil from erosion by water or wind; to reduce runoff from the land into surface water; and to maintain or improve soil quality."

  5. 92% Agronomy Series #132: Listing of Characterized Soils in Pennsylvania [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The Pennsylvania State University has been characterizing Pennsylvania soils since 1957. Prior to 1957, soils from three counties (Lancaster in 1955, Chester in 1956, and Erie in 1956) were sampled and characterized by the USDA Soil Conservation Service (SCS). The characterization process entails the excavation of a soil pit, a description of the pedon's (profile) morphology (color, structure, etc.), as well as a description of site characteristics (slope, vegetation, etc.). In addition the soil is sampled horizon by horizon and various laboratory analyses are performed on the collected samples."

  6. 92% Agronomy Series #144: Pennsylvania Soil Survey The First 100 Years [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "This publication celebrates the centennial (1899-1999) of the United States Cooperative Soil Survey Program and documents some historical aspects of the soil survey history of Pennsylvania. We hope that this publication will help archive this information for future soil scientists in the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It also compliments two previous attempts to document some soil survey history of Pennsylvania (Ciolkosz et al., 1998, and Ciolkosz et al., 1999)."

  7. 88% Agronomy Facts 35: Some Facts About Soil Basics
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The earth is covered by a thin layer of soil, composed of minerals, organic matter, and living organisms. Within this layer is a record of the area's geological and climactic history, as well as information about the suitability of future use of the soil. Soils affect many areas of our lives; we depend on the soil to grow our food and support the buildings we live and work in. Soils form an essential element in the ecosystem. Human activities that damage soils threaten to disrupt the delicate balance that sustains life. It is important to have a basic understanding of the formation and properties of soils to determine their future uses and to manage soils wisely."

  8. 88% Agronomy Series #142: Pennsylvania Soil Survey History [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "This publication celebrates the centennial (1899-1999) of the United States Cooperative Soil Survey Program and documents some historical aspects of the soil survey history of Pennsylvania. In 1986, Dr. Robert Cunningham et al. (1986), prepared a Penn State Agronomy Series (No. 90) publication which was a collection of papers by a number of authors on various aspects of the soil survey in Pennsylvania. That publication did not get wide distribution and is reproduced in this publication as Chapters 3-8. In addition, Chapter 2 has been added to document the initiation and development of the Penn State Soil Characterization Laboratory. The laboratory was the original focus of the Basic Soils Inventory Program within the Penn State Agronomy Department and has contributed greatly to the Cooperative Soil Survey Program in Pennsylvania. In Pennsylvania, the Cooperative Soil Survey Program includes the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), formally the USDA Soil Conservation Service (SCS), the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources (now the PADEP), the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, and the Penn State University College of Agricultural Sciences."

  9. 86% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 10: Animal Waste Land Application Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Managing the land application of animal waste to protect water quality depends on applying rates based on crop requirements and soil conditions, knowing the composition of the animal waste, avoiding runoff from recent applications, and protecting the application areas from runoff and soil erosion. Runoff from fields and water leaching through soil can carry plant nutrients, soil, microorganisms, and other potential pollutants from the fields to surface water or groundwater."

  10. 86% Using Composts to Improve Turf Performance
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "If you have been searching for ways to improve turf performance in marginal or poor soils, consider using compost as a soil amendment. In clay soils, good quality compost will improve structure, reduce surface crusting and compaction, promote drainage, and provide nutrients. In sandy soils, compost increases water and nutrient retention, supplies nutrients, and increases microbial activity. These improvements promote faster turf establishment, improved turf density and color, increased rooting, and less need for fertilizer and irrigation."

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