AgMap: Promoting America's Agriculture


Search AgMap
Within State, County
Within miles of zip code  

Search Results

14 matches found for seed potatoes in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 10 of 14

  1. 100% Turfgrass Seed and Seed Mixtures
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "One of the most important steps in turfgrass establishment is the selection of high quality seed or a seed mixture that is adapted to the site conditions and intended use of the turf. Poor quality seed may be low in viability and contain weed seeds as well as undesirable grass species. Consequently, the use of poor quality seed may result in unsatisfactory turf establishment, thus, wasted time, effort, and money. Also, If the species in the seed mixture are not adapted to the conditions at the site, the resulting stand may become thin and subject to soil erosion and weed encroachment."

  2. 96% Agronomy Facts 33: Use of brassica crops to extend the grazing season [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Cool-season perennial grass and grass-legume pastures typically become less productive as the grazing season advances from June to November. Forage brassica crops such as turnip, swede, rape, and kale can be spring-seeded to supplement the perennial cool-season pastures in August and September or summer-seeded to extend the grazing season in November and December. Brassicas are annual crops which are highly productive and digestible and can be grazed 80 to 150 days after seeding, depending on the species."

  3. 80% Agronomy Facts 39: Prarie Grass [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Prairie grass ( Kunth.) is a tallgrowing perennial grass that is suited to well-drained soils with medium to high fertility levels and a pH of 6.0 or greater. Prairie grass is a type of bromegrass, but unlike smooth bromegrass it does not have rhizomes and produces seed heads each growth period, especially during the summer. Herbage and immature seed heads of prairie grass are highly palatable."

  4. 80% Agronomy Facts 49: Successful Forage Crop Establishment
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Because of high costs, seeding forage crops is considered to be a "high stakes" farming operation. The days of spreading some seeds on the ground and hoping for nature to cooperate are past. Today, success is imperative. Forage producers must minimize risk as much as possible to ensure successful forage crop establishment. Here are some practices that can improve the success of forage crop seedings."

  5. 53% Agronomy Facts 4: Johnsongrass and Shattercane Control [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Johnsongrass and shattercane are closely related grass weeds that are troublesome and persistent in row crops, where they reduce yield and quality. The rhizomes of johnsongrass and the dormant seeds of shattercane make these weeds difficult to control. They can be managed with a consistent integrated program combining preventive, cultural, mechanical, and chemical methods."

  6. 53% Conservation Tillage Series: Cover Crops for Conservation Tillage Systems [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Producers seed cover crops to provide a soil cover or barrier against soil erosion. In addition, cover crops can improve the soil by adding organic matter, nutrients, and stability and by acting as scavengers to trap leftover nutrients that otherwise might leach out. Cover crops are used as ground cover, mulches, green manure, nurse crops, smother crops, and forage and food for animals or humans. Cover crops can be annual or perennial species, including certain legumes, grasses, and non-leguminous dicots."

  7. 53% Performance of Kentucky Bluegrass Turfgrass Cultivars: 1992-94
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Tests of commercially-available turfgrass cultivars and experimental selections are conducted annually at Penn State University to provide turfgrass managers, seed industry representatives, county extension agents, and other interested persons with information about turfgrass characteristics and performance."

  8. 53% Performance of Tall Fescue Turfgrass Cultivars and Selections at University Park, PA 1992-95
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Tests of commercially available turfgrass cultivars and experimental selections are conducted annually at Penn State University to provide turfgrass managers, seed industry representatives, county extension agents, and other interested persons with information about turfgrass characteristics and performance. In September 1992, 68 tall fescue cultivars were established at the Joseph Valentine Turfgrass Research Center in University Park, PA. Entries were supplied by the National Turfgrass Evaluation Program, an organization established to coordinate the evaluation of turfgrass cultivars and experimental selections in many locations throughout the United States. The following is a report on the performance of tall fescue cultivars from 1992 through 1995."

  9. 53% Performance of Bentgrass Cultivars and Selections under Fairway Conditions (1993-97) [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Tests of commercially-available turfgrass cultivars and experimental selections are conducted annually in University Park, PA to provide turfgrass managers, seed industry representatives, county extension agents, and other interested persons with information about turfgrass characteristics and performance. In September 1993, 21 bentgrass cultivars and selections were established at the Joseph Valentine Turfgrass Research Center in University Park, PA. Entries were supplied by the National Turfgrass Evaluation Program (NTEP). The following is a report on the performance of these entries from 1993 to 1997."

  10. 53% Performance of Fine Fescue Cultivars and Selections (1993-1996) [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Tests of commercially available turfgrass cultivars and experimental selections are conducted annually in University Park, PA to provide turfgrass managers, seed industry representatives, county extension agents, and other interested persons with information about turfgrass characteristics and performance. In September 1993, sixty-six fine fescue cultivars and selections were established at the Joseph Valentine Turfgrass Research Center in University Park, PA. Entries were supplied by the National Turfgrass Evaluation Program (NTEP). The following is a report on the performance of these entries between 1993 and 1996."

1 2 Next

(Query Time Used: 47 millisecond)

Your Account:

You are not currently logged in.

Now on AgMap:

AgMap is nationwide ! Find out more!!

Options:



Search AgMap
Advanced Search