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7 matches found for rough cut lumber in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 7 of 7

  1. 100% Environmental Soil Issues: Garden Use of Treated Lumber [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Because it has excellent decay resistance, treated lumber is often used in situations when wood needs to be in contact with soil. In the garden, this includes use as bed borders or trim; support for raised garden beds; plant stakes; and compost bins. However, many gardeners are concerned that the chemicals used to preserve the lumber could harm garden plants and the people who eat them. This fact sheet explains the most widely used method for treating wood, examines the possible risks from gardening uses of treated lumber, and makes recommendations for reducing any such risks."

  2. 81% Agronomy Facts 7: Cutting management of alfalfa, red clover, and birdsfoot trefoil [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The goal of most forage programs is to maximize economic yield of nutrients while ensuring stand persistence. Frequent cutting produces high-quality forage while less frequent cutting generally results in increased stand longevity. Therefore, harvest management of perennial legumes such as alfalfa, red clover, and birdsfoot trefoil requires a compromise between quality and persistence."

  3. 81% Considerations in Managing Cutting Height of Corn Silage
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Recently, interest has developed in cutting corn silage higher during harvest to improve the forage quality. Cutting corn silage higher can increase silage quality because the lower part of the crop is poorly digestible, but this can also reduce yield."

  4. 54% Agronomy Facts 56: Considerations for Double-cropping Corn Following Hay in Pennsylvania
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Double-cropping corn following the first cutting of hay can be an effective cropping strategy to maximize feed production on fields that are being rotated from hay to corn. Many crop producers in Pennsylvania routinely use this strategy with a good success rate, but it requires careful management. Without paying some attention to the details, you may obtain disappointing results. The objectives of this fact sheet are to review the advantages and disadvantages of double-cropping corn following hay and to provide some recommendations for improving the success rate of the practice."

  5. 54% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 6: Stream and Drainageway Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Water is one of our most important resources. In the past, it was advantageous to have a water source close to the farmstead. Today, numerous farms have a stream or drainageway cutting through heavily used pastures, exercise lots, or barnyards. As more cows are concentrated on an area, the potential increases for sediment, bacteria, nitrogen, and phosphorus to run off into these streams. However, if managed properly, on-farm streams can be useful for livestock watering and valuable for fish and wildlife habitat."

  6. 54% Mowing Turfgrasses
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Grass cutting is the major time-consuming operation in the maintenance of any turfgrass area. Good mowing practices are perhaps the most important single factor contributing to a well-groomed appearance and the longevity of any turfgrass area."

  7. 54% Top 10 Keys to Building a Profitable Dairy Business [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Managing your expenses is not the same as cutting expenses. The key is to know the difference between productive and unproductive expenses. Some experts may argue that managing expenses should be at the top of this list, but in most instances the costs of inputs, such as feed, are beyond your control. The most profitable improvements can be achieved by addressing the items at the top of this list."


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