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16 matches found for my little salesman in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 10 of 16

  1. 100% Agricultural Alternatives: Beef Backgrounding Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "The term ?backgrounding? may be relatively new to some.However, this management system is well known to bothcow-calf producers and cattle feeders. Backgrounding is abeef production system that uses pasture and other foragesfrom the time calves are weaned until they are placed in afeedlot. Calves generally gain from 100 to 400 pounds,depending on the available forages, ration fed, and length of time involved. The weight gain comes primarily frommuscle and frame development, with little from fattening.These gains are accomplished as economically as possibleby making maximum use of forages such as pasture, hay,and silage. Little, if any, grain is used in mostbackgrounding programs."

  2. 100% Agricultural Alternatives: Feeder Lamb Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Feeder lamb production is a livestock enterprise adaptableto small-scale and part-time farms in Pennsylvania. Feederlambs are purchased as premarket-weight lambs, fed to adesirable market weight, and then sold. When purchased,lambs can weigh as little as 35 pounds or less and as muchas 60 pounds. These lambs are usually marketed at 110pounds through local auctions, slaughterhouses, brokers,and individuals. In recent years, direct markets, nichemarkets, tel-a-auctions, and marketing cooperatives havebecome popular for selling lambs. The wool is sold throughlocal and national markets, brokers, and wool cooperatives."

  3. 94% Agronomy Facts 7: Cutting management of alfalfa, red clover, and birdsfoot trefoil [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The goal of most forage programs is to maximize economic yield of nutrients while ensuring stand persistence. Frequent cutting produces high-quality forage while less frequent cutting generally results in increased stand longevity. Therefore, harvest management of perennial legumes such as alfalfa, red clover, and birdsfoot trefoil requires a compromise between quality and persistence."

  4. 94% Agronomy Facts 23: Summer-Annual Grasses for Supplemental or Emergency Forage [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Shortages of forage crops in Pennsylvania most often occur during the summer, when dry conditions have reduced the productivity of pastures, hay crops, or silage corn fields. Summer-annual grasses, which maintain relatively high levels of production during hot and dry conditions, can greatly reduce the risk of inadequate forage production during the summer. They also can be used as an emergency forage source when production of corn and hay crops is likely to be less than adequate."

  5. 94% Agronomy Facts 27: Smooth Bromegrass [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Smooth bromegrass ( L.) is a leafy, sod-forming perennial grass that is best suited for hay or early spring pasture. It is deep-rooted and spreads by underground rhizomes. It matures somewhat later in the spring than orchardgrass and makes less summer growth than orchardgrass. Forage quality of smooth bromegrass compares well with other cool-season grasses, being affected primarily by stage of maturity."

  6. 94% Agronomy Facts 28: Tall Fescue [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Tall fescue ( Schreb.) is a deep-rooted, long-lived, sod-forming grass that spreads by short underground stems called rhizomes. In Pennsylvania it has been used primarily for conservation purposes but is well suited as hay, silage, or pasture. It is well adapted to the soil and weather conditions of Pennsylvania. It is especially well adapted to acid, wet soils of shale origin and produces more forage than other cool-season grasses on soils with a pH of less than 5.5."

  7. 94% Agronomy Facts 33: Use of brassica crops to extend the grazing season [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Cool-season perennial grass and grass-legume pastures typically become less productive as the grazing season advances from June to November. Forage brassica crops such as turnip, swede, rape, and kale can be spring-seeded to supplement the perennial cool-season pastures in August and September or summer-seeded to extend the grazing season in November and December. Brassicas are annual crops which are highly productive and digestible and can be grazed 80 to 150 days after seeding, depending on the species."

  8. 94% Agronomy Facts 44: Forage Quality Testing: Why, How, and Where [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "For nearly four decades, scientists have been refining the ability to test forages for quality. This research is being done in an effort to improve animal nutrition and, consequently, animal production. In the past, analytical procedures required a week or more to complete. They can now be done in less than 10 minutes, with greater accuracy than before."

  9. 94% Environmental Soil Issues: Land Application of Sewage Sludge in Pennsylvania - What is sewage sludge and what can be done with it? [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Before 1950, most communities in the United States discharged their wastewater, or sewage, into streams and rivers with little if any treatment. As urban populations increased, the natural ability of streams and rivers to handle the wasterwater was overwhelmed and caused water quality to deteriorate in many regions. In response to concerns about water quality degradation, thousands of communities throughout the United States constructed wastewater treatment systems during the 1950s and 1960s. This resulted in greatly improved stream and river water quality, but created another material to deal with: ."

  10. 94% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 8: Silage Storage Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Silage is an essential feed for livestock-based agriculture. It can be made from corn, silage crops such as grass and alfalfa, or from crop processing wastes. When properly harvested and stored, silage poses little or no pollution threat. However, improper silage-making and storing can result in liquid effluents, gases, malodors, undesirable microorganisms, and waste or spoiled silage."

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