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114 matches found for manure for sale pennsylvania in Extension Publications

Results 81 - 90 of 114

  1. 31% Pennsylvania Soil Quality Assessment Worksheet [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

  2. 31% Environmental Standards of Production for Larger Pork Producers in Pennsylvania [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Pork production facilities have increased in size in recent years, and large operations now account for the majority of the pigs raised in the United States. This 28-page manual provides planning agencies, township supervisors, regulatory agencies, and hog farmers with a tool to gauge plans for developing a new swine farm or improving an existing site."

  3. 31% Milk Components and Quality: New Methods for Paying Pennsylvania Dairy Farmers [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Important new regulations in Pennsylvania have resulted in drastic changes to farmers' milk checks. Federal order reform has implemented Multiple Component Pricing (MCP), which eliminates flat milk prices and instead pays farmers for the actual amounts of various components in their milk. This 12-page publication explains MCP, illustrates the new milk check, and instructs farmers on performing simple calculations to compare their new milk prices to order averages. A final section describes steps farmers can take to obtain higher component levels from their herds."

  4. 31% Milk Production Costs of Pennsylvania Dairy Farms [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    ""If you don't measure it, you can't control it". Producers must first determine their costs if they are to gain control over them. "

  5. 31% Pennsylvania 4-H Market Swine Reference [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Welcome to the 4-H market swine project! Thisproject can be an unforgettable learning experience.You will do many things that will helpyou grow personally and develop skills thatwill help you become a more responsible person.Skills you learn from raising a pig will bevaluable in the future and will carry over intoother aspects of your experience as a 4-H?er. Wehope you will have fun, too."

  6. 31% Pennsylvania Equine Industry Profile [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This fact sheet is a report about the commonwealth's equine industry. It is a large, diverse and economically important enterprise, ranking second only to dairy cattle among all agricultural commodities."

  7. 31% Summary of the 1997 Pennsylvania Dairy Farm Practices Survey [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This 10-page report summarizes the results of a 1997 mail survey of the principal operators of Pennsylvania dairy farms. It included questions about farm resources, cropping acreage, technology use, future production and technology plans, operator characteristics, and grazing practices."

  8. 26% Agronomy Facts 48: Forage Sorghum [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Forage sorghum is a large, warm-season, annual grass that is adapted to Pennsylvania and can be grown as a silage crop. Forage sorghum can be a profitable alternative crop, provided that it is managed well and used in the right situations. For instance, forage sorghum is cheaper to produce, has comparable yields, but has slightly lower forage quality when compared to corn for silage. The objective of this fact sheet is to describe some attributes of forage sorghum, provide some management recommendations, and describe the potential role of forage sorghum in the forage/livestock systems used on many Pennsylvania farms."

  9. 26% The Grass Keeps Getting Greener: 75 Years of Turfgrass Research and Education at Penn State [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A history of Turfgrass Science at The Pennsylvania State University. The turfgrass program at Penn State began in 1929 with a push from outside the institution. Joseph Valentine and several fellow superintendents from Philadelphia area golf courses traveled to The Pennsylvania State College and made a request directly to the president for the initiation of a turfgrass research and educational program. They stated that they wanted to have their needs addressed the same way farmers were being served through the agricultural programs in place at that time. The president immediately agreed to their request. Within a few days, Burt Musser, a young red clover breeder in the Department of Agronomy, was assigned the responsibility for initiating such a program. In time, this half-time assignment involving a single individual expanded to become one of the largest and most prestigious turfgrass programs in the United States. Today, nine faculty members from the Departments of Crop and Soil Sciences (formerly Agronomy), Plant Pathology, and Entomology, as well as a large number of support staff and graduate assistants, are involved in turfgrass research and education at Penn State."

  10. 26% Agricultural Alternatives: Milking Sheep Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Sheep products in Pennsylvania do not have to be limited tomeat and wool. There is a growing interest in milking sheepand sheep milk products. In Europe, sheep dairying is afairly common enterprise, and sheep breeds have beendeveloped specifically for milk production. It is not unusual for these breeds to average four to seven pounds of milk daily. The European breeds, however, are not available in the United States because of import restrictions. Sheep breeds common to Pennsylvania average between .75 and 2.0 pounds of milk daily. This requires U.S. sheep producers interested in dairying to carefully select ewes based on milk production and durability. Crossbred ewes produce more milk and are more durable than some purebreds."

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