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114 matches found for manure for sale pennsylvania in Extension Publications

Results 31 - 40 of 114

  1. 42% Center for Turfgrass Science 2002 Annual Research Report
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The Annual Research Report published by the Penn State Center for Turfgrass Science in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Turfgrass Council."

  2. 42% Center for Turfgrass Science 2003 Annual Research Report [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The Annual Research Report published by the Penn State Center for Turfgrass Science in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Turfgrass Council."

  3. 42% Pennsylvania 4-H Livestock Project Record [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This site contains a Pennsylvania 4-H livestock project record document, which a person can use to construct their own project record book."

  4. 38% Agronomy Facts 18: Corn silage production and management
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Corn harvested for silage is an important feed crop on most Pennsylvania farms, where cropland often is limited. The crop provides livestock producers with a high-yielding, relatively consistent source of forage and the animals with a highly digestible and palatable feed. Corn silage produces more energy per acre than any other crop grown in Pennsylvania."

  5. 38% Agronomy Facts 28: Tall Fescue [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Tall fescue ( Schreb.) is a deep-rooted, long-lived, sod-forming grass that spreads by short underground stems called rhizomes. In Pennsylvania it has been used primarily for conservation purposes but is well suited as hay, silage, or pasture. It is well adapted to the soil and weather conditions of Pennsylvania. It is especially well adapted to acid, wet soils of shale origin and produces more forage than other cool-season grasses on soils with a pH of less than 5.5."

  6. 38% Agronomy Facts 46: Multiflora Rose Management in Grass Pastures (An Integrated Approach) [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The weed multiflora rose (, Thunb.) is an increasing problem in Pennsylvania pastures and noncropland. It thrives on idle land, fencerows, and low-maintained, hilly pastures. Originally introduced from Asia and promoted as a "living fence" to control erosion and provide food and cover for wildlife, multiflora rose quickly spread and is considered a noxious weed in Pennsylvania and surrounding states."

  7. 38% Agronomy Facts 52: Potential of Narrow Row Corn Production in Pennsylvania [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Traditionally, corn produced in Pennsylvania and surrounding states is grown in rows that are 30 inches or wider. Now, producers and researchers are considering the potential of narrower rows such as 15 to 22 inches for corn production in Pennsylvania. The interest in narrow rows is sparked by several possible advantages of this production system: higher yields, better weed control, decreased potential for soil erosion, and increased nutrient uptake."

  8. 38% Farmland Protection and GIS [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Farmland is under increasing development pressure from expanding metropolitan areas and suburban sprawl in many areas across the nation. In 1998, the Pennsylvania 21st century environment commission, a diverse panel of experts, identified urban sprawl as the most important environmental concern in the state. A look at the numbers shows why: Between 1982 and 1997, 1.47 million acres of farmland were developed in Pennsylvania, representing 94% of all newly developed land."

  9. 38% Agronomy Series #132: Listing of Characterized Soils in Pennsylvania [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The Pennsylvania State University has been characterizing Pennsylvania soils since 1957. Prior to 1957, soils from three counties (Lancaster in 1955, Chester in 1956, and Erie in 1956) were sampled and characterized by the USDA Soil Conservation Service (SCS). The characterization process entails the excavation of a soil pit, a description of the pedon's (profile) morphology (color, structure, etc.), as well as a description of site characteristics (slope, vegetation, etc.). In addition the soil is sampled horizon by horizon and various laboratory analyses are performed on the collected samples."

  10. 38% Agronomy Series #144: Pennsylvania Soil Survey The First 100 Years [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "This publication celebrates the centennial (1899-1999) of the United States Cooperative Soil Survey Program and documents some historical aspects of the soil survey history of Pennsylvania. We hope that this publication will help archive this information for future soil scientists in the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It also compliments two previous attempts to document some soil survey history of Pennsylvania (Ciolkosz et al., 1998, and Ciolkosz et al., 1999)."

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