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37 matches found for kegel produce in Extension Publications

Results 21 - 30 of 37

  1. 58% Making Crop Rotations a Priority [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Many Pennsylvania dairy farmers overlook the benefits of a well-planned crop rotation. Good crop rotation planning can help producers meet feed production goals, reduce pesticide use and erosion, produce higher yields, and maximize nutrient management opportunities."

  2. 58% Soybean Rust Identification and Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soybean rust is a serious threat to soybean production in many parts of the world. If uncontrolled, the disease can cause yield losses approaching 80 percent in some parts of the world including Asia, Africa, and South America. Soybean rust was first reported in the continental United States on November 10, 2004, and was subsequently found in a total of nine southern states. If soybean rust does become established in southern states or in the Caribbean islands, the disease is likely to spread into northern and northeastern soybean-producing states each year."

  3. 58% Agricultural Alternatives: Accelerated Lamb Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "An effective method for increasing revenue from a lambproduction enterprise is to increase the number of lambsproduced per ewe each year. With high-level managementand production skills, it is possible to produce three lambcrops per ewe every two years. This technique is calledaccelerated lambing. It combines spring, off-season, andholiday lamb production into one enterprise. It also allowsfor increased efficiency in use of labor, land, equipment, and buildings."

  4. 58% Agricultural Alternatives: Beef cow-calf production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "The United States is the leading beef producer in the world. Almost 26.9 billion pounds of beef were produced in the United States in 2000 and per capita consumption totaled 78 pounds. The cattle cycle currently is in a declining phase. A smaller calf crop, a slight decline in cattle feeding, small decline in slaughter rates, and stable consumption rates will be evident for several years. Profitability in the cattle business usually increases as production declines."

  5. 58% Agricultural Alternatives: Feeding Beef Cattle [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "The United States is the leading beef producer in the world.Almost 26.9 billion pounds of beef were produced in theUnited States in 2000 and per capita consumption totaled 78pounds. The cattle cycle currently is in a declining phase,and several more years are expected of smaller calf crops, a slight decline in cattle feeding, small decline in slaughter rates, and stable consumption rates. Profitability in the cattle business usually increases as production declines."

  6. 58% From Feed to Milk: Understanding Rumen Function [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Feed costs represent 45 to 60 percent of the total cost of producing milk. The key to maximizing dairy farm profitability is to maintain nutrient levels while carefully managing feed costs. This 32-page publication provides a basic understanding of dairy cattle nutrition and its role in good herd management. It covers rumen physiology and function, nutritional concepts behind feeding dairy cattle, dry matter intake and its effect on the cow, and feed and feed nutrients for dairy cattle. "

  7. 58% The Anatomy of the Udder
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This video is designed to help viewers understand how the dairy cow produces milk. The video uses live animals, excised udders, and detailed diagrams to examine bovine lymph and blood circulatory systems, including supportive and secretory tissues."

  8. 37% Agronomy Facts 48: Forage Sorghum [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Forage sorghum is a large, warm-season, annual grass that is adapted to Pennsylvania and can be grown as a silage crop. Forage sorghum can be a profitable alternative crop, provided that it is managed well and used in the right situations. For instance, forage sorghum is cheaper to produce, has comparable yields, but has slightly lower forage quality when compared to corn for silage. The objective of this fact sheet is to describe some attributes of forage sorghum, provide some management recommendations, and describe the potential role of forage sorghum in the forage/livestock systems used on many Pennsylvania farms."

  9. 37% Agronomy Facts 62: Weed Management in Pasture Systems [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Weeds are troublesome in many ways. They reduce yield by robbing crops of water, light, space, and soil nutrients. Weeds can replace desirable grass species, filling in gaps or voids and reducing yield and overall quality of pasture and forages. Weeds can produce allelopathic substances that are toxic to crop plants. In addition, plants such as poison hemlock (Conium maculatum), white snakeroot (Eupatorium rugosum), and black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) have toxic properties that can cause livestock injury or loss under certain circumstances. To plan an effective weed management program, a producer must be able to identify weeds and understand how weed biology and ecology affects where weeds are found and their value or detriment."

  10. 37% Agronomy Facts 63: Diagnosing Soil Compaction using a Penetrometer (soil compaction tester)
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil compaction is a serious concern for farmers in Pennsylvania. Soil compaction can easily reduce crop yields by 10 percent, and can lead to water and soil quality degradation due to increased runoff and soil structure destruction. The continuous consolidation of farms means that herds are growing, more forage is harvested per farm, more manure is being produced, larger equipment is used to spread manure and harvest and transport forages and grain, and the opportunity to tailor field operations to optimum soil conditions for traffic is decreasing. Compaction is therefore an issue that will likely increase in importance in the years to come."

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