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68 matches found for irish acres tree farm in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 10 of 68

  1. 100% Agronomy Facts 34: Considerations for selecting corn hybrids in Pennsylvania [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Selecting the best corn hybrids can be a significant factor in the profitability of a corn production enterprise. The differences in performance among commercially available corn hybrids of the same maturity generally exceed 15 bushels per acre and frequently reach 50 bushels per acre. As a result, improving corn yields by an average of 5 to 10 bushels per acre through careful attention to hybrid selection is not unrealistic."

  2. 78% Agronomy Facts 18: Corn silage production and management
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Corn harvested for silage is an important feed crop on most Pennsylvania farms, where cropland often is limited. The crop provides livestock producers with a high-yielding, relatively consistent source of forage and the animals with a highly digestible and palatable feed. Corn silage produces more energy per acre than any other crop grown in Pennsylvania."

  3. 77% Growing Turf Under Shaded Conditions
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The establishment and management of quality turfgrass under shaded conditions often is possible if the basic requirements for turfgrass growth are known and understood. Trees have extensive root systems (often quite shallow) that enable them to utilize huge amounts of water and nutrients, and they have dense leaves that severely restrict the light intensity under the trees. These three factors - competition for water, nutrients, and light - are the basic causes of turfgrass failure under shaded conditions. Poor drainage also contributes to poor turfgrass development in shaded areas. Poorly drained shaded areas often become infested with moss, which provides additional turfgrass competition."

  4. 59% Agronomy Facts 45: Forage Chicory
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Forage chicory ( L.) is a perennial plant that is suited to well-drained or moderately drained soils with medium-to high-fertility levels and a pH of 5.5 or greater. Chicory produces leafy growth which is higher in nutritive and mineral content (if managed properly) than is produced by alfalfa or cool-season grasses. It has a relatively deep taproot which provides for tolerance to drought conditions. Chicory provides both spring and summer forage with average growth rates from April through October of 50 pounds per acre per day. During peak growth periods chicory produces 73 pounds per acre per day."

  5. 59% Soil Management Research Reports: Tillage Evaluation Study Landisville, Lancaster County [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Research in the early 1980?s showed that no-till produced lower yields than conventional till (moldboard or chisel plowed) at the Penn State Southeast Agricultural Research and Extension Center. However, research from similar agroecological zones shows no yield decrease in no-till corn compared to conventional tillage. Although the benefits of no-till have been confirmed in many studies in different parts of the USA, only 8% of the planted acres was no-tilled in Lancaster County in 2000, while 91% of the planted acres was not under conservation tillage (i.e. it had less than 30% crop residue at the surface at planting). Conservation tillage has important benefits for the environment, but if yields are not competitive its adoption will be inhibited."

  6. 58% Agronomy Facts 57: Crop Rotation Planning for Dairy Farms
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Crop rotations can benefit dairy farms in many ways. An effective crop rotation meets the feed needs of the operation, improves crop yields, reduces pest problems, and effectively uses on-farm nutrients. Because the resources and needs of dairy farms differ, the best crop rotation for each farm also will vary. As farms expand and forage and nutrient manage-ment requirements change, crop rotations also can be refined and improved. Because many factors can influence crop rotations, planning decisions are often complex. The objective of this fact sheet is to review some potential benefits of crop rotations and provide some guidelines for using them as a tool to address various production problems."

  7. 58% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Program Brochure [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The Pennsylvania Farm Evaluation Program (Pennsylvania Farm?A?Syst) is a voluntary farm evaluation that can be used to confirm that a farm is being managed in an environmentally sensitive way. Pennsylvania Farm?A?Syst also promotes an awareness of existing site conditions or management practices that threaten the quality of groundwater and surface water."

  8. 58% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Introduction [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The introduction includes a preliminary screening quiz that can help prioritize which Pennsylvania Farm?A?Syst worksheets to complete. It also includes a farmstead map worksheet, which is hand drawn by the evaluator to locate important features that may impact water quality. The worksheets can be used individually or together for a more complete evaluation."

  9. 58% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Preliminary Screening Quiz [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Everything we do affects groundwater or surface water quality. Evaluation worksheets are available for farmstead management practices and site conditions. This preliminary screening quiz can help prioritize more detailed farmstead evaluations, which are available through the Pennsylvania Farm?A?Syst program."

  10. 58% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 1: Water Well Condition and Construction [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "About 80% of Pennsylvania?s rural residents use groundwater to supply their drinking water and farmstead needs. Wells are designed to provide clean water. If they are not properly constructed or maintained, groundwater may become contaminated with bacteria, nitrates, and pesticides. These contaminants put family and livestock health at risk."

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