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11 matches found for hay in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 10 of 11

  1. 100% Agronomy Facts 32: Pasture and Hay for Horses
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Horses are used in a wide variety of activities throughout Pennsylvania and adjoining states. Most of these horses are owned and managed for recreation or sport rather than for profit. One of the main expenses in owning a horse is feed. To minimize feed costs, it is important to keep horses healthy and feed them a balanced ration that meets their nutritional needs."

  2. 100% Agronomy Facts 56: Considerations for Double-cropping Corn Following Hay in Pennsylvania
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Double-cropping corn following the first cutting of hay can be an effective cropping strategy to maximize feed production on fields that are being rotated from hay to corn. Many crop producers in Pennsylvania routinely use this strategy with a good success rate, but it requires careful management. Without paying some attention to the details, you may obtain disappointing results. The objectives of this fact sheet are to review the advantages and disadvantages of double-cropping corn following hay and to provide some recommendations for improving the success rate of the practice."

  3. 100% Agronomy Facts 32: Pasture and Hay for Horses [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "One of the main expenses in owning a horse is feed. This four-page fact sheet explains how horses naturally use forages as a primary component of their diets and how these requirements can be supplied by pasture and hay. It also covers pasture and hay production and management, as well as forage concerns related to horses."

  4. 100% Sources of food processing wastes, hay and feed ingredients [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "List of addresses and phone numbers for sources of feed sold directly to farmers or arranged for local sales at intermediate prices. Other sources may exist."

  5. 96% Agronomy Facts 23: Summer-Annual Grasses for Supplemental or Emergency Forage [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Shortages of forage crops in Pennsylvania most often occur during the summer, when dry conditions have reduced the productivity of pastures, hay crops, or silage corn fields. Summer-annual grasses, which maintain relatively high levels of production during hot and dry conditions, can greatly reduce the risk of inadequate forage production during the summer. They also can be used as an emergency forage source when production of corn and hay crops is likely to be less than adequate."

  6. 94% Agronomy Facts 19: Ryegrass
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Ryegrasses are the most widely grown cool-season grasses in the world. They have numerous desirable agronomic qualities. They establish rapidly, have a long growing season, are high yielding under favorable environments when supplied with adequate nutrients, possess high nutrient contents, and can be grazed and used for hay or silage. Ryegrasses grow best on fertile, well-drained soils but can be grown on soils where it is too wet at certain times of the year for satisfactory growth of other grasses."

  7. 94% Agronomy Facts 27: Smooth Bromegrass [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Smooth bromegrass ( L.) is a leafy, sod-forming perennial grass that is best suited for hay or early spring pasture. It is deep-rooted and spreads by underground rhizomes. It matures somewhat later in the spring than orchardgrass and makes less summer growth than orchardgrass. Forage quality of smooth bromegrass compares well with other cool-season grasses, being affected primarily by stage of maturity."

  8. 94% Agronomy Facts 28: Tall Fescue [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Tall fescue ( Schreb.) is a deep-rooted, long-lived, sod-forming grass that spreads by short underground stems called rhizomes. In Pennsylvania it has been used primarily for conservation purposes but is well suited as hay, silage, or pasture. It is well adapted to the soil and weather conditions of Pennsylvania. It is especially well adapted to acid, wet soils of shale origin and produces more forage than other cool-season grasses on soils with a pH of less than 5.5."

  9. 94% Dairy Feed Industry Seminar 1999
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "A difficulty that can arise in formulating rations is that the nutrient content of ration ingredients can vary quite widely, particularly when forages, such as hay and silage, or by-products, such as bakery waste, are included. The variation in nutrient content can have a negative impact on the productivity of the animals concerned, whetherthey are lactating cows or growing heifers. This negative impact is particularly critical if the producer considers the ration has sufficient nutrient content based on mean values.As a result the variation in nutrient should be taken into account when formulating therations."

  10. 94% Protein in Pastures: Can It Be Too High? [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "The nutrient quality of well-managed pasture is often higher than the same plant material harvested as silage or hay. This can present unique challenges in feeding dairy cows. A discussion of protein content in pastures and strategies to manage it is provided in this paper."

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