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113 matches found for hay for sale lancaster pennsylvania in Extension Publications

Results 81 - 90 of 113

  1. 19% Summary of the 1997 Pennsylvania Dairy Farm Practices Survey [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This 10-page report summarizes the results of a 1997 mail survey of the principal operators of Pennsylvania dairy farms. It included questions about farm resources, cropping acreage, technology use, future production and technology plans, operator characteristics, and grazing practices."

  2. 19% Agronomy Facts 48: Forage Sorghum [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Forage sorghum is a large, warm-season, annual grass that is adapted to Pennsylvania and can be grown as a silage crop. Forage sorghum can be a profitable alternative crop, provided that it is managed well and used in the right situations. For instance, forage sorghum is cheaper to produce, has comparable yields, but has slightly lower forage quality when compared to corn for silage. The objective of this fact sheet is to describe some attributes of forage sorghum, provide some management recommendations, and describe the potential role of forage sorghum in the forage/livestock systems used on many Pennsylvania farms."

  3. 19% Agronomy Facts 54: Pennsylvania's Nutrient Management Act: Who Will Be Affected? [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "In the spring of 1993, the Pennsylvania legislature passed and the governor signed the Nutrient Management Act into law. Before this legislation was passed, problems with nutrient pollution were administered under the Clean Streams Law, which dealt only with surface waters. This existing law stated that if a farmer follows practices in the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) publication (Manure Manual), no special permits or approvals are required for manure utilization on farms. The Nutrient Management Act is the first law in Pennsylvania that requires regulatory oversight of nutrient plans on certain farms. This law oversight of nutrient plans on certain farms. This law will take effect on October 1, 1997. An important question is, who will be affected by this legislation?"

  4. 19% The Grass Keeps Getting Greener: 75 Years of Turfgrass Research and Education at Penn State [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A history of Turfgrass Science at The Pennsylvania State University. The turfgrass program at Penn State began in 1929 with a push from outside the institution. Joseph Valentine and several fellow superintendents from Philadelphia area golf courses traveled to The Pennsylvania State College and made a request directly to the president for the initiation of a turfgrass research and educational program. They stated that they wanted to have their needs addressed the same way farmers were being served through the agricultural programs in place at that time. The president immediately agreed to their request. Within a few days, Burt Musser, a young red clover breeder in the Department of Agronomy, was assigned the responsibility for initiating such a program. In time, this half-time assignment involving a single individual expanded to become one of the largest and most prestigious turfgrass programs in the United States. Today, nine faculty members from the Departments of Crop and Soil Sciences (formerly Agronomy), Plant Pathology, and Entomology, as well as a large number of support staff and graduate assistants, are involved in turfgrass research and education at Penn State."

  5. 19% Agricultural Alternatives: Milking Sheep Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Sheep products in Pennsylvania do not have to be limited tomeat and wool. There is a growing interest in milking sheepand sheep milk products. In Europe, sheep dairying is afairly common enterprise, and sheep breeds have beendeveloped specifically for milk production. It is not unusual for these breeds to average four to seven pounds of milk daily. The European breeds, however, are not available in the United States because of import restrictions. Sheep breeds common to Pennsylvania average between .75 and 2.0 pounds of milk daily. This requires U.S. sheep producers interested in dairying to carefully select ewes based on milk production and durability. Crossbred ewes produce more milk and are more durable than some purebreds."

  6. 17% Agronomy Facts 5: Quackgrass Management: An Integrated Approach [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Quackgrass is a widespread, persistent, cool-season, grassy weed found in Pennsylvania row and forage crops. This competitive perennial grass can reduce crop yields up to 95 percent. It can be managed with a consistent integrated program combining preventive, cultural, mechanical, and chemical methods."

  7. 17% Agronomy Facts 20: Birdsfoot Trefoil [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Producing high-quality forage for cattle and sheep has traditionally been difficult on marginal lands in Pennsylvania and New York. Soils with few limitations are generally sown to alfalfa. Soils with a low pH, poor drainage, poor native fertility, or fragipans prone to heaving are not suitable for alfalfa production. Birdsfoot trefoil ( L.) is a forage legume that is more tolerant of these adverse production conditions."

  8. 17% Agronomy Facts 24: Timothy
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Timothy ( L.) is a perennial, bunch-type, shallow-rooted, cool-season grass that is well adapted to the Northeast and Upper Midwest. Its shallow root system, however, makes it unsuited to droughty soils. Timothy is popular in the northern half of Pennsylvania and most of New York State because of its natural adaptation to moist, cool environments."

  9. 17% Agronomy Facts 25: Orchardgrass
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Orchardgrass ( L.) is a perennial, cool-season, tall-growing, grass which does not have rhizomes or stolons (bunch-type grass). It starts growth early in spring, develops rapidly, and flowers during May under Pennsylvania conditions. Orchardgrass is more tolerant of shade, drought, and heat than is timothy, perennial ryegrass or Kentucky bluegrass but also grows well in full sunlight."

  10. 17% Agronomy Facts 26: Reed Canarygrass [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Reed canarygrass ( L.) is a tall, leafy, high-yielding perennial. It is a cool-season grass which is greater in winterhardiness and more resistant to foliar diseases than other cool-season grasses grown in Pennsylvania. The plants spread and thicken from short rhizomes, creating a dense sod. If not grazed or clipped, plants will reach heights exceeding 6 feet under high fertility conditions."

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