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113 matches found for hay for sale lancaster pennsylvania in Extension Publications

Results 101 - 110 of 113

  1. 17% 2000 Dairy Farm Business Analysis [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This 24-page analysis provides summary information for various categories of dairy farms and is intended for more general use as an aid to decision making on Pennsylvania dairy farms. As such, the report should be useful to extension agents, individual dairy farmers, and a variety of business, government, and educational professionals."

  2. 17% Agricultural Alternatives - Boarding Horses [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "The equine industry in Pennsylvania has doubled in sizesince 1967 and continues to expand and diversify. As aresult, the demand for horse boarding services has increased. Many Pennsylvanians enjoy a variety of recreational activities involving horses, such as trail riding, participating in horse and pony clubs, and competing in shows and other events. Horses contribute to the state?s economy by creating a market for feed, supplies, and the services of boarders, veterinarians, trainers, breeders, and farriers."

  3. 17% Agricultural Alternatives: Off-Season and Holiday Lamb Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Of the approximately 160,000 Pennsylvania lambs marketedeach year, 30 percent are sold as off-season and holidaylambs. These lambs are marketed using both conventional(auctions, slaughterhouses, and brokers) and nonconventional(niche markets, specialty stores, and direct marketing)methods. The ideal market weight is 110 pounds for offseasonlambs and 40 to 45 pounds for holiday lambs."

  4. 17% Agricultural Alternatives: Veal Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Special-fed veal producers place 750,000 to 800,000 bobcalves, animals less than 7 days old, annually for vealproduction. Most of these calves are bull calves fromHolstein herds. There are approximately 1,400 veal producersin the United States, where production is concentrated inIndiana, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, andWisconsin. The largest demand for veal is in the Northeast,but most large cities have markets."

  5. 17% Animal diagnostic, forage, and feed testing laboratories in the northeast [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "List of addresses and phone numbers for laboratories in Pennsylvania and nearby states. These listings do not constitute an endorsement of these labs."

  6. 17% Mid-Atlantic Dairy Management Conference 1999 - Systematic Approach to Dairying in the Next Millenium [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This is the proceedings from the 1999 Mid-Atlantic Dairy Management Conference that was held on February 24-25 in Camp Hill, Pennsylvania. The topics covered range from environmental issues like nutrient management to heifer production. It is in PDF format."

  7. 12% Environmental Soil Issues: Land Application of Sewage Sludge in Pennsylvania - What is sewage sludge and what can be done with it? [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Before 1950, most communities in the United States discharged their wastewater, or sewage, into streams and rivers with little if any treatment. As urban populations increased, the natural ability of streams and rivers to handle the wasterwater was overwhelmed and caused water quality to deteriorate in many regions. In response to concerns about water quality degradation, thousands of communities throughout the United States constructed wastewater treatment systems during the 1950s and 1960s. This resulted in greatly improved stream and river water quality, but created another material to deal with: ."

  8. 12% Environmental Soil Issues: Land Application of Sewage Sludge in Pennsylvania - Effects of Biosolids on Soil and Crop Quality [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The use of biosolids on Pennsylvania cropland has been a common practice since the mid-1970s. Biosolids contain essential plant nutrients and organic matter that can benefit crop production. Therefore land application of biosolids represents a beneficial reuse alternative to landfill disposal or incineration. Like any other soil amendment, biosolids application to agricultural land must be properly managed to obtain maximum benefits and minimize potential environmental risks. This fact sheet, which is part of a series on land application of biosolids, presents the results of a three-year research project that investigated how agronomic biosolids utilization has affected soil and crop quality."

  9. 11% Agronomy Facts 17: Pre-sidedress Soil Nitrate Test for Corn [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A new approach to N soil testing whereby samples are taken during the growing season has been under study by researchers across the country, including a major effort in Pennsylvania. This test is called the Pre-sidedress Soil Nitrate Test (PSNT). The basis for this new N soil testing approach is taking soil samples just before sidedressing? after the spring wet period but before the period of major N demand by corn-and determining the nitrate-N available in the soil at that time. The results are then used to make sidedress N recommendations."

  10. 11% Agronomy Facts 63: Diagnosing Soil Compaction using a Penetrometer (soil compaction tester)
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil compaction is a serious concern for farmers in Pennsylvania. Soil compaction can easily reduce crop yields by 10 percent, and can lead to water and soil quality degradation due to increased runoff and soil structure destruction. The continuous consolidation of farms means that herds are growing, more forage is harvested per farm, more manure is being produced, larger equipment is used to spread manure and harvest and transport forages and grain, and the opportunity to tailor field operations to optimum soil conditions for traffic is decreasing. Compaction is therefore an issue that will likely increase in importance in the years to come."

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