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113 matches found for hay for sale lancaster pennsylvania in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 10 of 113

  1. 100% Agronomy Facts 56: Considerations for Double-cropping Corn Following Hay in Pennsylvania
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Double-cropping corn following the first cutting of hay can be an effective cropping strategy to maximize feed production on fields that are being rotated from hay to corn. Many crop producers in Pennsylvania routinely use this strategy with a good success rate, but it requires careful management. Without paying some attention to the details, you may obtain disappointing results. The objectives of this fact sheet are to review the advantages and disadvantages of double-cropping corn following hay and to provide some recommendations for improving the success rate of the practice."

  2. 86% Agronomy Facts 23: Summer-Annual Grasses for Supplemental or Emergency Forage [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Shortages of forage crops in Pennsylvania most often occur during the summer, when dry conditions have reduced the productivity of pastures, hay crops, or silage corn fields. Summer-annual grasses, which maintain relatively high levels of production during hot and dry conditions, can greatly reduce the risk of inadequate forage production during the summer. They also can be used as an emergency forage source when production of corn and hay crops is likely to be less than adequate."

  3. 84% Agronomy Series #132: Listing of Characterized Soils in Pennsylvania [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The Pennsylvania State University has been characterizing Pennsylvania soils since 1957. Prior to 1957, soils from three counties (Lancaster in 1955, Chester in 1956, and Erie in 1956) were sampled and characterized by the USDA Soil Conservation Service (SCS). The characterization process entails the excavation of a soil pit, a description of the pedon's (profile) morphology (color, structure, etc.), as well as a description of site characteristics (slope, vegetation, etc.). In addition the soil is sampled horizon by horizon and various laboratory analyses are performed on the collected samples."

  4. 72% Agronomy Facts 28: Tall Fescue [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Tall fescue ( Schreb.) is a deep-rooted, long-lived, sod-forming grass that spreads by short underground stems called rhizomes. In Pennsylvania it has been used primarily for conservation purposes but is well suited as hay, silage, or pasture. It is well adapted to the soil and weather conditions of Pennsylvania. It is especially well adapted to acid, wet soils of shale origin and produces more forage than other cool-season grasses on soils with a pH of less than 5.5."

  5. 68% Agronomy Facts 32: Pasture and Hay for Horses [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "One of the main expenses in owning a horse is feed. This four-page fact sheet explains how horses naturally use forages as a primary component of their diets and how these requirements can be supplied by pasture and hay. It also covers pasture and hay production and management, as well as forage concerns related to horses."

  6. 67% Soil Management Research Reports: Tillage Evaluation Study Landisville, Lancaster County [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Research in the early 1980?s showed that no-till produced lower yields than conventional till (moldboard or chisel plowed) at the Penn State Southeast Agricultural Research and Extension Center. However, research from similar agroecological zones shows no yield decrease in no-till corn compared to conventional tillage. Although the benefits of no-till have been confirmed in many studies in different parts of the USA, only 8% of the planted acres was no-tilled in Lancaster County in 2000, while 91% of the planted acres was not under conservation tillage (i.e. it had less than 30% crop residue at the surface at planting). Conservation tillage has important benefits for the environment, but if yields are not competitive its adoption will be inhibited."

  7. 64% Agricultural Alternatives: Swine Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Technological change and vertical integration in the swineindustry have resulted in fewer farms producing recordamounts of pork. The number of operators involved in swineproduction in Pennsylvania fell from 20,000 at the beginningof 1981 to 3,456 in 1997. Pennsylvania remains animportant swine producer with market value of sales rankingit 12th in the country. Approximately 70 percent of Pennsylvania swine operations produce less than 100 head per year, and only 2.8 percent produce more than 1,000 head per year. While the trend in the swine industry continues towards larger farms, opportunities remain to make money by raising hogs in a part-time enterprise."

  8. 63% Sources of food processing wastes, hay and feed ingredients [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "List of addresses and phone numbers for sources of feed sold directly to farmers or arranged for local sales at intermediate prices. Other sources may exist."

  9. 58% Cereal Rust Mite
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Significant losses in timothy from feeding by the cereal rust mite have been reported in Lancaster, Lebanon, Dauphin, and York counties over the last two years. It is likely that the mite also has been causing losses in other counties across the state. Yield loss estimates range from 30-70%."

  10. 53% Agronomy Facts 32: Pasture and Hay for Horses
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Horses are used in a wide variety of activities throughout Pennsylvania and adjoining states. Most of these horses are owned and managed for recreation or sport rather than for profit. One of the main expenses in owning a horse is feed. To minimize feed costs, it is important to keep horses healthy and feed them a balanced ration that meets their nutritional needs."

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