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76 matches found for green spring trout farms in Extension Publications

Results 11 - 20 of 76

  1. 65% Nutrient management: Friend or Foe [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "There is the possibility to improve the whole farm nutrient balance and the public's perception of farming."

  2. 64% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Program Brochure [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The Pennsylvania Farm Evaluation Program (Pennsylvania Farm?A?Syst) is a voluntary farm evaluation that can be used to confirm that a farm is being managed in an environmentally sensitive way. Pennsylvania Farm?A?Syst also promotes an awareness of existing site conditions or management practices that threaten the quality of groundwater and surface water."

  3. 63% Begin Planning For Spring Labor Needs [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Dairy farm businesses that produce their own crops need to recognize that their labor and managment requirements increase dramatically during planting and harvest times. "

  4. 58% The Grass Keeps Getting Greener: 75 Years of Turfgrass Research and Education at Penn State [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A history of Turfgrass Science at The Pennsylvania State University. The turfgrass program at Penn State began in 1929 with a push from outside the institution. Joseph Valentine and several fellow superintendents from Philadelphia area golf courses traveled to The Pennsylvania State College and made a request directly to the president for the initiation of a turfgrass research and educational program. They stated that they wanted to have their needs addressed the same way farmers were being served through the agricultural programs in place at that time. The president immediately agreed to their request. Within a few days, Burt Musser, a young red clover breeder in the Department of Agronomy, was assigned the responsibility for initiating such a program. In time, this half-time assignment involving a single individual expanded to become one of the largest and most prestigious turfgrass programs in the United States. Today, nine faculty members from the Departments of Crop and Soil Sciences (formerly Agronomy), Plant Pathology, and Entomology, as well as a large number of support staff and graduate assistants, are involved in turfgrass research and education at Penn State."

  5. 58% 1993-1997 Bentgrass Greens Reports [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

  6. 58% Performance of Bentgrass Cultivars and Selections under Putting Green Conditions (1998-2002) [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Tests of commercially available turfgrass cultivars and experimental selections are conducted annually in University Park, PA to provide turfgrass managers, seed industry representatives, county extension agents, and other interested persons with information about turfgrass characteristics and performance. In September 1998, twenty-nine bentgrass cultivars and selections were established at the Joseph Valentine Turfgrass Research Center in University Park, PA. Entries were supplied by the National Turfgrass Evaluation Program (NTEP). The following is a report on the performance of these entries from 1998 through 2002."

  7. 52% Agronomy Facts 57: Crop Rotation Planning for Dairy Farms
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Crop rotations can benefit dairy farms in many ways. An effective crop rotation meets the feed needs of the operation, improves crop yields, reduces pest problems, and effectively uses on-farm nutrients. Because the resources and needs of dairy farms differ, the best crop rotation for each farm also will vary. As farms expand and forage and nutrient manage-ment requirements change, crop rotations also can be refined and improved. Because many factors can influence crop rotations, planning decisions are often complex. The objective of this fact sheet is to review some potential benefits of crop rotations and provide some guidelines for using them as a tool to address various production problems."

  8. 50% Agronomy Facts 6: Comparing Fertilizing Materials
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Nutrients are often a limiting factor for plant growth. Under natural conditions, an equilibrium is established that depends on recyling of nutrients to meet plant needs. This equilibrium is disturbed when agricultural crops are grown. Soils must provide greater amounts of plant nutrients than would be needed for natural vegetation. Also, a significant portion of the nutrients are no longer recycled but are removed in the harvested crops. Farmers must supply supplemental nutrients to the soils to ensure optimal crop growth. These supplemental nutrients come in many forms including fertilizers, animals manures, green manures, and legumes. This fact sheet concentrates on the properties of commonly used fertilizers that are important in achieving optimal plant growth."

  9. 45% Agronomy Facts 43: Four Steps to Rotational Grazing [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A well-managed pasture program can be the most economical way to provide forage to ruminant animals. On dairy farms where pasture makes up a significant portion of the forage program, feed costs may be reduced during the grazing season by $.50 to $1.00 a day per cow. However, careful planning and sound management are needed to optimize pasture utilization and animal performance. Knowing your animals, plants, and soils and being able to respond to their needs are skills that must be developed if rotational grazing is to be successful on your farm."

  10. 45% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 6: Stream and Drainageway Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Water is one of our most important resources. In the past, it was advantageous to have a water source close to the farmstead. Today, numerous farms have a stream or drainageway cutting through heavily used pastures, exercise lots, or barnyards. As more cows are concentrated on an area, the potential increases for sediment, bacteria, nitrogen, and phosphorus to run off into these streams. However, if managed properly, on-farm streams can be useful for livestock watering and valuable for fish and wildlife habitat."

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