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71 matches found for franks farm market in Extension Publications

Results 61 - 70 of 71

  1. 27% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 10: Animal Waste Land Application Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Managing the land application of animal waste to protect water quality depends on applying rates based on crop requirements and soil conditions, knowing the composition of the animal waste, avoiding runoff from recent applications, and protecting the application areas from runoff and soil erosion. Runoff from fields and water leaching through soil can carry plant nutrients, soil, microorganisms, and other potential pollutants from the fields to surface water or groundwater."

  2. 27% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Overall Farmstead Ranking [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "This form is designed for collecting the average rankings from completed worksheets in one place for an overall comparison and interpretation."

  3. 27% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Farmstead Map [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A map can be a record of important features on the farmstead that can impact water quality. Drawing a farmstead map will make it easier to evaluate potential sources of pollution and to locate wells, septic tanks and absorption fields in the future when they need maintenance."

  4. 27% Dairy Farm Business: Job Descriptions?The Building Blocks of Organization [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "The primary objective of a job description is to help employeesand supervisors reach a mutual understanding about importantdetails of a job in order to avoid future problems. This eight-page publication discusses the need for job descriptions, how to prepare them, and how to make use of them for more effective human resource management. It includes examples of job descriptions for positions in the milking center are included."

  5. 27% Dairy Farm Business: Making Custom Work Profitable [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Learn about the issues involved in making a custom hire decision including advantages and disadvantages, economics, how to find custom operators, contracting, and deciding whether the producer should do custom work. "

  6. 27% Milk Production Costs of Pennsylvania Dairy Farms [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    ""If you don't measure it, you can't control it". Producers must first determine their costs if they are to gain control over them. "

  7. 18% Agronomy Facts 48: Forage Sorghum [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Forage sorghum is a large, warm-season, annual grass that is adapted to Pennsylvania and can be grown as a silage crop. Forage sorghum can be a profitable alternative crop, provided that it is managed well and used in the right situations. For instance, forage sorghum is cheaper to produce, has comparable yields, but has slightly lower forage quality when compared to corn for silage. The objective of this fact sheet is to describe some attributes of forage sorghum, provide some management recommendations, and describe the potential role of forage sorghum in the forage/livestock systems used on many Pennsylvania farms."

  8. 18% Environmental Soil Issues: Land Application of Sewage Sludge in Pennsylvania - Use of Biosolids in Crop Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Approximately 300,000 tons (on a dry-weight basis) of municipal sewage sludge are produced each year in Pennsylvania. Three viable options now exist for disposal or use of this sludge: landfill placement; incineration; and recycling through application to farm, forest, or mine land. Although each of these options has its place, recycling efforts have increased in recent years because of growing recognition that our society cannot afford to throw away the valuable resources in sewage sludge. Before sewage sludges can be applied to farmland, however, they must be treated further to stabilize organic material and significantly reduce pathogens. Sewage sludges that have undergone such treatment and that are of sufficiently high quality to be used as an agricultural soil amendment ("land applied") under the current regulations are known as ."

  9. 18% Soil Management Research Reports: Tillage Evaluation Study Rock Springs, Centre County
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Six tillage treatments were started in 1978 at the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center in Rock Springs in Centre County, Pennsylvania. The plots have been planted in corn every year since the beginning of the study with the exception of 1986 when Ogle oats were planted, and 1993 when soybeans were planted in some of the plots. The six tillage treatments have remained as originally established, except for the "disked once" treatment which was discontinued to introduce the zone-till treatment in 2001. With collaboration from the staff at the Larson Agronomy Research Farm at Rock Springs, this study was continued in 2003 in the Fry K field."

  10. 18% Estrous synchronization programs for the dairy herd [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "The major factor limiting optimumreproductive performance on many farms is failureto detect estrus in a timely and accurate manner.Several prostaglandin (PG) products are availablefor use in synchronizing estrus in heifers andlactating dairy cattle. These products wereoriginally used to treat individual cows that hadnot exhibited heat by the time of desired firstservice. Several controlled or programmedbreeding programs have been developed forsynchronizing groups of lactating cattle.PG to all open cows within a breeding groupwithout palpation. The potential advantages ofcontrolled breeding are listed below.Potential advantages ofcontrolled breeding1. Improve the efficiency of heat detection.2. Achieve more timely first service. "

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