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63 matches found for farm in Extension Publications

Results 51 - 60 of 63

  1. 93% Pennsylvania Equine Industry Inventory, Economic and Demographic Characteristics [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Pennsylvania?s equine industry is a diverse and thriving industry that supports a variety ofactivities and businesses. The equine industry is a major contributor to the state?s economythrough employment, tax dollars, and assets. Moreover, the value of the state?s horse industryextends to all residents. Equid are valued for their companionship and use, enhancing the stateresidents? quality of life. Equid play an essential role in Pennsylvania?s Amish community asthey are heavily relied upon for transportation and farm work. Knowledge of the current sizeand character of the Pennsylvania equine industry is essential to help shape the future of thisindustry."

  2. 50% Milk Production Costs of Pennsylvania Dairy Farms [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    ""If you don't measure it, you can't control it". Producers must first determine their costs if they are to gain control over them. "

  3. 46% Agronomy Facts 54: Pennsylvania's Nutrient Management Act: Who Will Be Affected? [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "In the spring of 1993, the Pennsylvania legislature passed and the governor signed the Nutrient Management Act into law. Before this legislation was passed, problems with nutrient pollution were administered under the Clean Streams Law, which dealt only with surface waters. This existing law stated that if a farmer follows practices in the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) publication (Manure Manual), no special permits or approvals are required for manure utilization on farms. The Nutrient Management Act is the first law in Pennsylvania that requires regulatory oversight of nutrient plans on certain farms. This law oversight of nutrient plans on certain farms. This law will take effect on October 1, 1997. An important question is, who will be affected by this legislation?"

  4. 45% Agricultural Alternatives: Swine Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Technological change and vertical integration in the swineindustry have resulted in fewer farms producing recordamounts of pork. The number of operators involved in swineproduction in Pennsylvania fell from 20,000 at the beginningof 1981 to 3,456 in 1997. Pennsylvania remains animportant swine producer with market value of sales rankingit 12th in the country. Approximately 70 percent of Pennsylvania swine operations produce less than 100 head per year, and only 2.8 percent produce more than 1,000 head per year. While the trend in the swine industry continues towards larger farms, opportunities remain to make money by raising hogs in a part-time enterprise."

  5. 44% Agronomy Facts 16: Nutrient Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The economics of nutrient management are clear. Manage plant nutrients for maximum economic benefit to the farmer. That is an easy concept to accept. Profit is the bottom line in farming, as in any business."

  6. 44% Agronomy Facts 38A: A nutrient management approach for Pennsylvania: Introduction to the concepts
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Nutrient management has taken on new meaning in recent times. Soil fertility traditionally dealt with supplying and managing nutrients to meet crop production requirements. The predictable response of a crop to the application of a deficient nutrient has been the focus. Ways of farming to optimize agronomic production and economic returns to crop production were developed to take advantage of these expected crop responses. Changes in the supply of plant nutrients for this purpose have been dramatic since the end of World War II."

  7. 44% Agronomy Facts 49: Successful Forage Crop Establishment
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Because of high costs, seeding forage crops is considered to be a "high stakes" farming operation. The days of spreading some seeds on the ground and hoping for nature to cooperate are past. Today, success is imperative. Forage producers must minimize risk as much as possible to ensure successful forage crop establishment. Here are some practices that can improve the success of forage crop seedings."

  8. 44% Ag Alternatives: Rabbit Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Rabbit farming has grown from raising a few rabbits forfamily consumption to large commercial operations withhundreds of rabbits. Approximately 200,000 producersmarket 6 to 8 million rabbits annually in the United States,where 8 to 10 million pounds of rabbit meat are consumedeach year. Laboratories use nearly 600,000 rabbits a year for medical experiments and new product testing. On theinternational market, nearly 10,000 tons of Angora wool areconsumed annually."

  9. 44% Agronomy Facts 18: Corn silage production and management
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Corn harvested for silage is an important feed crop on most Pennsylvania farms, where cropland often is limited. The crop provides livestock producers with a high-yielding, relatively consistent source of forage and the animals with a highly digestible and palatable feed. Corn silage produces more energy per acre than any other crop grown in Pennsylvania."

  10. 44% Agronomy Facts 60: Nutrient Management Planning - Overview [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Nutrient management traditionally has been concerned with optimizing the economic returns from nutrients used to produce a crop. More recently, nutrient management also has begun to address ways to minimize the negative impact of nutrients on the environment. Programs such as the Chesapeake Bay Program and the Nutrient Management Act in Pennsylvania have focused attention on improving nutrient management on Commonwealth farms."

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