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63 matches found for farm in Extension Publications

Results 21 - 30 of 63

  1. 100% Dairy Farm Business: Job Descriptions?The Building Blocks of Organization [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "The primary objective of a job description is to help employeesand supervisors reach a mutual understanding about importantdetails of a job in order to avoid future problems. This eight-page publication discusses the need for job descriptions, how to prepare them, and how to make use of them for more effective human resource management. It includes examples of job descriptions for positions in the milking center are included."

  2. 100% Dairy Farm Business: Making Custom Work Profitable [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Learn about the issues involved in making a custom hire decision including advantages and disadvantages, economics, how to find custom operators, contracting, and deciding whether the producer should do custom work. "

  3. 100% Dairy Farm Feed Cost Control [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Feed costs represent between 50 and 60 percent of a dairy producer's expenses. To control on-farm feed costs, it is necessary to assess what forages and feeds currently are being fed and their current costs to the producer. This 32-page workbook, designed to be used with a computer spreadsheet program, can help you examine ways to control costs. This is a very specific program geared to dairy and farm management agents, dairy consultants, dairy nutritionists, veterinarians and dairy producers with good computer skills. To use the program, one needs either Windows 95 or 98 (Excel 97) or Mac OS 8.0 (Excel 98). "

  4. 100% Summary of the 1997 Pennsylvania Dairy Farm Practices Survey [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This 10-page report summarizes the results of a 1997 mail survey of the principal operators of Pennsylvania dairy farms. It included questions about farm resources, cropping acreage, technology use, future production and technology plans, operator characteristics, and grazing practices."

  5. 99% Agronomy Facts 38B: A nutrient management approach for Pennsylvania: Plant nutrient stocks and flows
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Almost all decision-making in agriculture, in the boardrooms of industry or on the tractor seats of farms, affects the distribution of materials such as crops and manure within farms, and the movement of materials such as feeds and farm products to and from farms. Most common farm materials contain important plant nutrients, such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, and are moved as part of the everyday activities of farming and agriculture. As a result, the many factors considered in each management decision affect plant nutrient distribution and have implications for nutrient management to meet the many expectations."

  6. 99% Agronomy Facts 57: Crop Rotation Planning for Dairy Farms
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Crop rotations can benefit dairy farms in many ways. An effective crop rotation meets the feed needs of the operation, improves crop yields, reduces pest problems, and effectively uses on-farm nutrients. Because the resources and needs of dairy farms differ, the best crop rotation for each farm also will vary. As farms expand and forage and nutrient manage-ment requirements change, crop rotations also can be refined and improved. Because many factors can influence crop rotations, planning decisions are often complex. The objective of this fact sheet is to review some potential benefits of crop rotations and provide some guidelines for using them as a tool to address various production problems."

  7. 96% Nutrient management: Friend or Foe [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "There is the possibility to improve the whole farm nutrient balance and the public's perception of farming."

  8. 95% Avoiding Soil Compaction [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Twenty-first-century farm economics stimulate farmers to increase the size of their operations. To improve labor efficiency, farm equipment usually increases in size. Tractors, combines, forage harvesters, grain and forage wagons, manure spreaders, and lime trucks are all bigger than they used to be. Twenty years ago, for example, 2.5-ton box-type manure spreaders were common in Pennsylvania, whereas today liquid manure spreaders may weigh 20 or 30 tons. The increasing size of farm equipment may cause significant soil compaction that can negatively affect soil productivity as well as environmental quality. This fact sheet focuses on ways to avoid soil compaction."

  9. 95% Agronomy Facts 43: Four Steps to Rotational Grazing [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A well-managed pasture program can be the most economical way to provide forage to ruminant animals. On dairy farms where pasture makes up a significant portion of the forage program, feed costs may be reduced during the grazing season by $.50 to $1.00 a day per cow. However, careful planning and sound management are needed to optimize pasture utilization and animal performance. Knowing your animals, plants, and soils and being able to respond to their needs are skills that must be developed if rotational grazing is to be successful on your farm."

  10. 95% Feeding the Newborn Dairy Calf [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Calf health, growth, and productivity rely heavily on nutrition and management practices. Every heifer calf born on a dairy farm represents an opportunity to maintain or increase herd size, to improve the herd genetically, or to improve economic returns to the farm. The objectives of raising the newborn calf to weaning age are optimizing growth and minimizing health problems. To accomplish these goals, it is necessary to understand the calf?s digestive and immune systems, her nutrient needs, and the feed options available to meet those needs."

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