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69 matches found for cut flower farm in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 10 of 69

  1. 100% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 6: Stream and Drainageway Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Water is one of our most important resources. In the past, it was advantageous to have a water source close to the farmstead. Today, numerous farms have a stream or drainageway cutting through heavily used pastures, exercise lots, or barnyards. As more cows are concentrated on an area, the potential increases for sediment, bacteria, nitrogen, and phosphorus to run off into these streams. However, if managed properly, on-farm streams can be useful for livestock watering and valuable for fish and wildlife habitat."

  2. 92% Agronomy Facts 7: Cutting management of alfalfa, red clover, and birdsfoot trefoil [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The goal of most forage programs is to maximize economic yield of nutrients while ensuring stand persistence. Frequent cutting produces high-quality forage while less frequent cutting generally results in increased stand longevity. Therefore, harvest management of perennial legumes such as alfalfa, red clover, and birdsfoot trefoil requires a compromise between quality and persistence."

  3. 92% Considerations in Managing Cutting Height of Corn Silage
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Recently, interest has developed in cutting corn silage higher during harvest to improve the forage quality. Cutting corn silage higher can increase silage quality because the lower part of the crop is poorly digestible, but this can also reduce yield."

  4. 84% Agronomy Facts 25: Orchardgrass
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Orchardgrass ( L.) is a perennial, cool-season, tall-growing, grass which does not have rhizomes or stolons (bunch-type grass). It starts growth early in spring, develops rapidly, and flowers during May under Pennsylvania conditions. Orchardgrass is more tolerant of shade, drought, and heat than is timothy, perennial ryegrass or Kentucky bluegrass but also grows well in full sunlight."

  5. 61% Agronomy Facts 56: Considerations for Double-cropping Corn Following Hay in Pennsylvania
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Double-cropping corn following the first cutting of hay can be an effective cropping strategy to maximize feed production on fields that are being rotated from hay to corn. Many crop producers in Pennsylvania routinely use this strategy with a good success rate, but it requires careful management. Without paying some attention to the details, you may obtain disappointing results. The objectives of this fact sheet are to review the advantages and disadvantages of double-cropping corn following hay and to provide some recommendations for improving the success rate of the practice."

  6. 61% Mowing Turfgrasses
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Grass cutting is the major time-consuming operation in the maintenance of any turfgrass area. Good mowing practices are perhaps the most important single factor contributing to a well-groomed appearance and the longevity of any turfgrass area."

  7. 61% Top 10 Keys to Building a Profitable Dairy Business [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Managing your expenses is not the same as cutting expenses. The key is to know the difference between productive and unproductive expenses. Some experts may argue that managing expenses should be at the top of this list, but in most instances the costs of inputs, such as feed, are beyond your control. The most profitable improvements can be achieved by addressing the items at the top of this list."

  8. 58% Agronomy Facts 38B: A nutrient management approach for Pennsylvania: Plant nutrient stocks and flows
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Almost all decision-making in agriculture, in the boardrooms of industry or on the tractor seats of farms, affects the distribution of materials such as crops and manure within farms, and the movement of materials such as feeds and farm products to and from farms. Most common farm materials contain important plant nutrients, such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, and are moved as part of the everyday activities of farming and agriculture. As a result, the many factors considered in each management decision affect plant nutrient distribution and have implications for nutrient management to meet the many expectations."

  9. 56% Nutrient management: Friend or Foe [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "There is the possibility to improve the whole farm nutrient balance and the public's perception of farming."

  10. 55% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Program Brochure [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The Pennsylvania Farm Evaluation Program (Pennsylvania Farm?A?Syst) is a voluntary farm evaluation that can be used to confirm that a farm is being managed in an environmentally sensitive way. Pennsylvania Farm?A?Syst also promotes an awareness of existing site conditions or management practices that threaten the quality of groundwater and surface water."

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