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240 matches found for crop management in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 10 of 240

  1. 100% Agronomy Facts 3: Soil Acidity and Aglime [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil acidity is among the important environmental factors which can influence plant growth, and can seriously limit crop production. Therefore, liming acid soils is basic to good soil and crop management."

  2. 100% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 2: Pesticide and Fertilizer Storage and Handling [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "When used properly, pesticides and fertilizers are effective crop management tools. However, these chemicals can endanger water quality and human health if they are not properly stored and handled. The chemicals can enter directly into the groundwater through wells or sinkholes at the farmstead or flow into surface water. When found in water supplies, pesticides normally are not present in high-enough concentrations to cause acute health effects. Instead, they typically occur at trace levels that may have effects after prolonged exposure."

  3. 52% Agronomy Facts 31A: Soil fertility management for forage crops Pre-establishment [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil fertility management for forage crops is a continuous process that begins well before the forage crop is established. In the pre-establishment phase the soil conditions are adjusted to provide optimum soil fertility when the crop is established. At establishment the fertility program should deal with any last-minute small adjustments in soil fertility and any requirements for getting the plants established, such as a starter fertilizer. Finally, once the crop is established the fertility program focuses on maintaining good soil fertility levels for the life of the forage stand."

  4. 52% Agronomy Facts 31B: Soil Fertility Management for Forage Crops Establishment
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil fertility management for forage crops is a continuous process that begins well before the forage crop is estab-lished. In the pre-establishment phase, the soil conditions are adjusted to provide optimum soil fertility when the crop is established. The fertility program during the establish-ment phase should deal with last minute, small adjust-ments in soil fertility and any requirements such as a starter fertilizer for getting the plants established. After the crop is established, the fertility program should focus on mainte-nance of good fertility levels in the soil for the life of the forage stand."

  5. 52% Agronomy Facts 31C: Soil Fertility Management for Forage Crops Maintenance [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil fertility management for forage crops is a continuous process that begins well before the forage crop is established. In the pre-establishment phase, the soil conditions are adjusted to provide optimum soil fertility when the crop is established. At establishment phase, the fertility program should deal with any last minute small adjustments in soil fertility and any requirements such as a starter fertilizer for getting the plants established. If the pre-establishment soil fertility goals are met and the stand is successfully established, the goal becomes maintenance of an adequate level of fertility to meet the needs of the crop throughout the life of the stand."

  6. 52% Agronomy Facts 58: Management of Eastern Black Nightshade in Agronomic Crops [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Eastern black nightshade Dun.), an annual broadleaf plant, is an increasing weed problem in northeastern field crop production. It is native to the Americas and is commonly found throughout the United States east of the Rocky Mountains. Nightshade begins germinating in May and can continue throughout the growing season. Although it can cause crop yield reductions, more importantly it can interfere with the harvest and lower crop quality."

  7. 52% Agronomy Facts 61: Wirestem Muhly Management in Agronomic Crops [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Wirestem muhly is a perennial grass species that can be problematic in conservation tillage production systems throughout Pennsylvania and the Northeast. It is a particular problem in no-till corn and soybean production, but it can also be troublesome in orchards, in nursery and vegetable crops, on roadsides and streambanks, and in other areas with rich, moist soils. It is native to America and can be found in many areas of the midwestern United States from South Dakota to Missouri and eastward to Virginia and Maine."

  8. 52% Agronomy Facts 64: Weed Management in Organic Cropping Systems
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "When managing weeds in organic systems, producers use many of the same techniques used in conventional systems, but they rely much more on nonchemical control strategies. The primary weed control strategies for organic systems are cultural and mechanical, focusing on prevention, crop rotation, crop competition, and cultivation."

  9. 50% The Agronomy Guide
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "This 327 page publication is designed for easy reading and quick reference. In Part One - Crop and Soil Management, the chapters on specific crops include information about varieties, nutritional requirements, establishment, harvesting and special considerations. In Part Two - Pest Management, the chapters on Pest Control for specific crops include sections on weeds, insects and diseases."

  10. 49% Agronomy Facts 38B: A nutrient management approach for Pennsylvania: Plant nutrient stocks and flows
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Almost all decision-making in agriculture, in the boardrooms of industry or on the tractor seats of farms, affects the distribution of materials such as crops and manure within farms, and the movement of materials such as feeds and farm products to and from farms. Most common farm materials contain important plant nutrients, such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, and are moved as part of the everyday activities of farming and agriculture. As a result, the many factors considered in each management decision affect plant nutrient distribution and have implications for nutrient management to meet the many expectations."

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