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8 matches found for ROSE VALLEY NATURALS in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 8 of 8

  1. 100% Agronomy Facts 46: Multiflora Rose Management in Grass Pastures (An Integrated Approach) [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The weed multiflora rose (, Thunb.) is an increasing problem in Pennsylvania pastures and noncropland. It thrives on idle land, fencerows, and low-maintained, hilly pastures. Originally introduced from Asia and promoted as a "living fence" to control erosion and provide food and cover for wildlife, multiflora rose quickly spread and is considered a noxious weed in Pennsylvania and surrounding states."

  2. 49% Agronomy Facts 6: Comparing Fertilizing Materials
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Nutrients are often a limiting factor for plant growth. Under natural conditions, an equilibrium is established that depends on recyling of nutrients to meet plant needs. This equilibrium is disturbed when agricultural crops are grown. Soils must provide greater amounts of plant nutrients than would be needed for natural vegetation. Also, a significant portion of the nutrients are no longer recycled but are removed in the harvested crops. Farmers must supply supplemental nutrients to the soils to ensure optimal crop growth. These supplemental nutrients come in many forms including fertilizers, animals manures, green manures, and legumes. This fact sheet concentrates on the properties of commonly used fertilizers that are important in achieving optimal plant growth."

  3. 49% Managing Phosphorus for Agriculture and the Environment [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Phosphorus (P) is an essential element for plant and animal growth and is necessary to maintain profitable crop and livestock production. It also can increase the biological productivity of surface waters by accelerating eutrophication, the natural aging of lakes or streams brought on by nutrient enrichment. Although eutrophication is a natural process, it can be sped up by changes in the land use of a watershed that increase the amount of nutrients added to an aquatic system. The Environmental Protection Agency has identified eutrophication as the main problem in United States surface waters that have impaired water quality."

  4. 47% Agronomy Facts 24: Timothy
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Timothy ( L.) is a perennial, bunch-type, shallow-rooted, cool-season grass that is well adapted to the Northeast and Upper Midwest. Its shallow root system, however, makes it unsuited to droughty soils. Timothy is popular in the northern half of Pennsylvania and most of New York State because of its natural adaptation to moist, cool environments."

  5. 47% Environmental Soil Issues: Land Application of Sewage Sludge in Pennsylvania - What is sewage sludge and what can be done with it? [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Before 1950, most communities in the United States discharged their wastewater, or sewage, into streams and rivers with little if any treatment. As urban populations increased, the natural ability of streams and rivers to handle the wasterwater was overwhelmed and caused water quality to deteriorate in many regions. In response to concerns about water quality degradation, thousands of communities throughout the United States constructed wastewater treatment systems during the 1950s and 1960s. This resulted in greatly improved stream and river water quality, but created another material to deal with: ."

  6. 47% Agronomy Series #133: Cambic Horizons in Pennsylvania Soils [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Cambic horizons are subsurface soil layers of pedogenic change without appreciable accumulation of illuvial material (clay, Fe + Al + humus, carbonate or gypsum), and are part of the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service?s (formerly the USDA Soil Conservation Service) Soil Classification System "Soil Taxonomy"."

  7. 30% Agronomy Series #142: Pennsylvania Soil Survey History [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "This publication celebrates the centennial (1899-1999) of the United States Cooperative Soil Survey Program and documents some historical aspects of the soil survey history of Pennsylvania. In 1986, Dr. Robert Cunningham et al. (1986), prepared a Penn State Agronomy Series (No. 90) publication which was a collection of papers by a number of authors on various aspects of the soil survey in Pennsylvania. That publication did not get wide distribution and is reproduced in this publication as Chapters 3-8. In addition, Chapter 2 has been added to document the initiation and development of the Penn State Soil Characterization Laboratory. The laboratory was the original focus of the Basic Soils Inventory Program within the Penn State Agronomy Department and has contributed greatly to the Cooperative Soil Survey Program in Pennsylvania. In Pennsylvania, the Cooperative Soil Survey Program includes the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), formally the USDA Soil Conservation Service (SCS), the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources (now the PADEP), the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, and the Penn State University College of Agricultural Sciences."

  8. 30% Agronomy Series #145: Pennsylvania State University Soil Characterization Laboratory Database System Documentation [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soils have been sampled and analyzed in Pennsylvania for characterization since 1954. The initial sampling was done by the USDA Soil Conservation Service (SCS) now known as the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Subsequent samplings have been done by the Penn State Soil Characterization Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the NRCS. Presently, 949 pedons (profiles) have been collected and analyzed. An account of the history of the sampling is given in Ciolkosz (1998). Initially the data (site, horizon, and laboratory) was available in hard copy printed form. Since the development of the computer, particularly the PC with large data capacities, the Pennsylvania analysis system and data have been computerized (see Ciolkosz, 2000; Ciolkosz and Thurman, 1992, 1994; Thurman et al., 1994). In order for a computer system to have longevity as it is modified and updated by computer programmers, the data system must be documented. Thus, the objective of this publication is to document the Penn State University Soil Characterization Laboratory Database System."


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