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37 matches found for Produce Crib in Extension Publications

Results 31 - 37 of 37

  1. 37% Environmental Soil Issues: Land Application of Sewage Sludge in Pennsylvania - Use of Biosolids in Crop Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Approximately 300,000 tons (on a dry-weight basis) of municipal sewage sludge are produced each year in Pennsylvania. Three viable options now exist for disposal or use of this sludge: landfill placement; incineration; and recycling through application to farm, forest, or mine land. Although each of these options has its place, recycling efforts have increased in recent years because of growing recognition that our society cannot afford to throw away the valuable resources in sewage sludge. Before sewage sludges can be applied to farmland, however, they must be treated further to stabilize organic material and significantly reduce pathogens. Sewage sludges that have undergone such treatment and that are of sufficiently high quality to be used as an agricultural soil amendment ("land applied") under the current regulations are known as ."

  2. 37% Disease Management in Turf
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Disease in turfgrasses, as in other plants, develops from an interaction among a susceptible plant, a disease-producing organism (pathogen), and an environment favorable for disease development. Susceptible grasses and pathogens (usually fungi) are present in all lawns. In most cases, the pathogens exist in a dormant or saprophytic (feeding on dead or decaying substances) state and do not attack living plants. Diseases occur when environmental conditions (weather, management, and / or site conditions) become favorable for the build up of pathogen populations and / or cause an increase in the susceptibility of the plant. When this happens, turfgrass loss can occur."

  3. 37% Agronomy Series #140: Metals Data for Pennsylvania Soils [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "In recent years, a great concern has developed in the effect of metals on the environment and human health. In particular, the threshold amounts of metals that impact the environment and health. As a part of this concern, a significant amount of research has been done on the background levels of these metals in the environment, in particular, in the soil. Many of these studies have not been published or are obscure and not readily available. To partially rectify this situation for Pennsylvania soils, this publication has been produced. This publication is a series of chapters of published and unpublished data, and little attempt has been made to synthesize the data from the various chapters, other than the comments given in the following section."

  4. 37% Managing Turfgrass Diseases
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Disease in turfgrasses, as in other plants, develops from an interaction among a susceptible plant, a disease-producing organism (pathogen), and an environment favorable for disease development. Susceptible grasses and pathogens (usually fungi) are present in all lawns. In most cases, the pathogens exist in a dormant or saprophytic (feeding on dead or decaying substances) state and do not attack living plants. Diseases occur when environmental conditions (weather, management, and / or site conditions) become favorable for the build up of pathogen populations and / or cause an increase in the susceptibility of the plant. When this happens, turfgrass loss can occur."

  5. 37% Soil Management Research Reports: Tillage Evaluation Study Landisville, Lancaster County [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Research in the early 1980?s showed that no-till produced lower yields than conventional till (moldboard or chisel plowed) at the Penn State Southeast Agricultural Research and Extension Center. However, research from similar agroecological zones shows no yield decrease in no-till corn compared to conventional tillage. Although the benefits of no-till have been confirmed in many studies in different parts of the USA, only 8% of the planted acres was no-tilled in Lancaster County in 2000, while 91% of the planted acres was not under conservation tillage (i.e. it had less than 30% crop residue at the surface at planting). Conservation tillage has important benefits for the environment, but if yields are not competitive its adoption will be inhibited."

  6. 37% Agricultural Alternatives: Milking Sheep Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Sheep products in Pennsylvania do not have to be limited tomeat and wool. There is a growing interest in milking sheepand sheep milk products. In Europe, sheep dairying is afairly common enterprise, and sheep breeds have beendeveloped specifically for milk production. It is not unusual for these breeds to average four to seven pounds of milk daily. The European breeds, however, are not available in the United States because of import restrictions. Sheep breeds common to Pennsylvania average between .75 and 2.0 pounds of milk daily. This requires U.S. sheep producers interested in dairying to carefully select ewes based on milk production and durability. Crossbred ewes produce more milk and are more durable than some purebreds."

  7. 37% Handling Hogs [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Each day approximately 250 hogs die during transit on their way to packing plants. That amounts to about $25,000 when hogs are worth $.40 per pound. Although most of thesedeaths are probably avoidable, many in the industry regard them as acceptable. Let's take a look at how the science of moving and transporting hogs could make a differencein these losses. This article provides some common sense management practices, as well as a number of recommendations from the Livestock Trucking Guide (produced by the Livestock Conservation Institute), and the Midwest Plan Service."

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