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100 matches found for Milk House Farm Market in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 10 of 100

  1. 100% Agricultural Alternatives: Dairy Goat Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Dairy goat production is an alternative livestock enterprisesuitable for many small-scale or part-time livestock operations.Some dairy goat producers have been successful inpasteurizing goat milk and building an on-farm juggingbusiness; others have ventured into processed milk productsfor retail distribution. The potential also exists for selling milk to processors, usually on a regional basis. Although fluid milk and processed products are important markets, dairy goat producers should also consider the potential for selling animals to hobbyists and youth involved in vocational agriculture livestock projects."

  2. 77% Ag Alternatives: Meat Goat Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Goat is the most highly consumed meat in the world; andmore goat?s milk is consumed worldwide than cow?s milk.In the United States, meat goat production is increasingbecause of goats? economic value as efficient converters oflow-quality forages into quality meat, milk, and hideproducts for specialty markets."

  3. 66% Agricultural Alternatives: Feeder Lamb Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Feeder lamb production is a livestock enterprise adaptableto small-scale and part-time farms in Pennsylvania. Feederlambs are purchased as premarket-weight lambs, fed to adesirable market weight, and then sold. When purchased,lambs can weigh as little as 35 pounds or less and as muchas 60 pounds. These lambs are usually marketed at 110pounds through local auctions, slaughterhouses, brokers,and individuals. In recent years, direct markets, nichemarkets, tel-a-auctions, and marketing cooperatives havebecome popular for selling lambs. The wool is sold throughlocal and national markets, brokers, and wool cooperatives."

  4. 64% Agricultural Alternatives: Off-Season and Holiday Lamb Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Of the approximately 160,000 Pennsylvania lambs marketedeach year, 30 percent are sold as off-season and holidaylambs. These lambs are marketed using both conventional(auctions, slaughterhouses, and brokers) and nonconventional(niche markets, specialty stores, and direct marketing)methods. The ideal market weight is 110 pounds for offseasonlambs and 40 to 45 pounds for holiday lambs."

  5. 56% Agronomy Facts 30: Forage Quality in Perspective [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Fluctuations in milk prices, feed costs, and government programs are forcing dairy farmers to become more efficient with their farm operation. Since feed accounts for approximately one-half of the total cost of producing milk, and high quality forage optimizes the productivity of the animals, increasing the quality of forage available is one of the best methods of improving overall feeding efficiency. To effectively produce high quality forage, it is necessary to understand what forage quality is and to keep the factors influencing forage quality in perspective."

  6. 55% Monitoring dry matter intake, milk production, and milk margin [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This fact sheet explains how to use an Excel template to monitor dry matter intake, milk production, and milk margin for the dairy herd."

  7. 55% Troubleshooting problems with low milk production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This publication includes topics on expected production, low peaks, failure to bag and produce ample milk, excessive decline in milk produciton, and short lactations."

  8. 54% Milk Components and Quality: New Methods for Paying Pennsylvania Dairy Farmers [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Important new regulations in Pennsylvania have resulted in drastic changes to farmers' milk checks. Federal order reform has implemented Multiple Component Pricing (MCP), which eliminates flat milk prices and instead pays farmers for the actual amounts of various components in their milk. This 12-page publication explains MCP, illustrates the new milk check, and instructs farmers on performing simple calculations to compare their new milk prices to order averages. A final section describes steps farmers can take to obtain higher component levels from their herds."

  9. 54% Milk Production Costs of Pennsylvania Dairy Farms [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    ""If you don't measure it, you can't control it". Producers must first determine their costs if they are to gain control over them. "

  10. 53% Troubleshooting milk flavor problems [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Covers farm related areas that can contribute to milk flavor problems. Topics include classification of off-flavors, rancid flavor, farm oxidized flavor, feed flavor, unclean flavor, malty, high acid and putrid."

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