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63 matches found for Farms in Extension Publications

Results 1 - 10 of 63

  1. 100% Agronomy Facts 57: Crop Rotation Planning for Dairy Farms
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Crop rotations can benefit dairy farms in many ways. An effective crop rotation meets the feed needs of the operation, improves crop yields, reduces pest problems, and effectively uses on-farm nutrients. Because the resources and needs of dairy farms differ, the best crop rotation for each farm also will vary. As farms expand and forage and nutrient manage-ment requirements change, crop rotations also can be refined and improved. Because many factors can influence crop rotations, planning decisions are often complex. The objective of this fact sheet is to review some potential benefits of crop rotations and provide some guidelines for using them as a tool to address various production problems."

  2. 100% Milk Production Costs of Pennsylvania Dairy Farms [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    ""If you don't measure it, you can't control it". Producers must first determine their costs if they are to gain control over them. "

  3. 99% Agronomy Facts 38B: A nutrient management approach for Pennsylvania: Plant nutrient stocks and flows
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Almost all decision-making in agriculture, in the boardrooms of industry or on the tractor seats of farms, affects the distribution of materials such as crops and manure within farms, and the movement of materials such as feeds and farm products to and from farms. Most common farm materials contain important plant nutrients, such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, and are moved as part of the everyday activities of farming and agriculture. As a result, the many factors considered in each management decision affect plant nutrient distribution and have implications for nutrient management to meet the many expectations."

  4. 96% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 6: Stream and Drainageway Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Water is one of our most important resources. In the past, it was advantageous to have a water source close to the farmstead. Today, numerous farms have a stream or drainageway cutting through heavily used pastures, exercise lots, or barnyards. As more cows are concentrated on an area, the potential increases for sediment, bacteria, nitrogen, and phosphorus to run off into these streams. However, if managed properly, on-farm streams can be useful for livestock watering and valuable for fish and wildlife habitat."

  5. 96% 2000 Dairy Farm Business Analysis [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This 24-page analysis provides summary information for various categories of dairy farms and is intended for more general use as an aid to decision making on Pennsylvania dairy farms. As such, the report should be useful to extension agents, individual dairy farmers, and a variety of business, government, and educational professionals."

  6. 96% Summary of the 1997 Pennsylvania Dairy Farm Practices Survey [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This 10-page report summarizes the results of a 1997 mail survey of the principal operators of Pennsylvania dairy farms. It included questions about farm resources, cropping acreage, technology use, future production and technology plans, operator characteristics, and grazing practices."

  7. 96% Agronomy Facts 54: Pennsylvania's Nutrient Management Act: Who Will Be Affected? [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "In the spring of 1993, the Pennsylvania legislature passed and the governor signed the Nutrient Management Act into law. Before this legislation was passed, problems with nutrient pollution were administered under the Clean Streams Law, which dealt only with surface waters. This existing law stated that if a farmer follows practices in the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) publication (Manure Manual), no special permits or approvals are required for manure utilization on farms. The Nutrient Management Act is the first law in Pennsylvania that requires regulatory oversight of nutrient plans on certain farms. This law oversight of nutrient plans on certain farms. This law will take effect on October 1, 1997. An important question is, who will be affected by this legislation?"

  8. 95% Agronomy Facts 43: Four Steps to Rotational Grazing [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A well-managed pasture program can be the most economical way to provide forage to ruminant animals. On dairy farms where pasture makes up a significant portion of the forage program, feed costs may be reduced during the grazing season by $.50 to $1.00 a day per cow. However, careful planning and sound management are needed to optimize pasture utilization and animal performance. Knowing your animals, plants, and soils and being able to respond to their needs are skills that must be developed if rotational grazing is to be successful on your farm."

  9. 94% Agricultural Alternatives: Swine Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Technological change and vertical integration in the swineindustry have resulted in fewer farms producing recordamounts of pork. The number of operators involved in swineproduction in Pennsylvania fell from 20,000 at the beginningof 1981 to 3,456 in 1997. Pennsylvania remains animportant swine producer with market value of sales rankingit 12th in the country. Approximately 70 percent of Pennsylvania swine operations produce less than 100 head per year, and only 2.8 percent produce more than 1,000 head per year. While the trend in the swine industry continues towards larger farms, opportunities remain to make money by raising hogs in a part-time enterprise."

  10. 94% Agronomy Facts 63: Diagnosing Soil Compaction using a Penetrometer (soil compaction tester)
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil compaction is a serious concern for farmers in Pennsylvania. Soil compaction can easily reduce crop yields by 10 percent, and can lead to water and soil quality degradation due to increased runoff and soil structure destruction. The continuous consolidation of farms means that herds are growing, more forage is harvested per farm, more manure is being produced, larger equipment is used to spread manure and harvest and transport forages and grain, and the opportunity to tailor field operations to optimum soil conditions for traffic is decreasing. Compaction is therefore an issue that will likely increase in importance in the years to come."

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