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78 matches found for Brook Lawn Farm Market in Extension Publications

Results 51 - 60 of 78

  1. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 7: Petroleum Storage and Handling [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Liquid petroleum products are concentrated, effective sources of power, lubrication, and heat. Aboveground and underground storage of petroleum products such as transportation fuel and heating fuel, however, can be a threat to family and farm safety, public health, and the environment."

  2. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 8: Silage Storage Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Silage is an essential feed for livestock-based agriculture. It can be made from corn, silage crops such as grass and alfalfa, or from crop processing wastes. When properly harvested and stored, silage poses little or no pollution threat. However, improper silage-making and storing can result in liquid effluents, gases, malodors, undesirable microorganisms, and waste or spoiled silage."

  3. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 9: Animal Waste Storage Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Runoff from livestock production facilities can carry manure, soil, microorganisms, and other potential pollutants that could contaminate surface water and groundwater sources. If not managed properly, animal wastes can affect water quality and human health."

  4. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 10: Animal Waste Land Application Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Managing the land application of animal waste to protect water quality depends on applying rates based on crop requirements and soil conditions, knowing the composition of the animal waste, avoiding runoff from recent applications, and protecting the application areas from runoff and soil erosion. Runoff from fields and water leaching through soil can carry plant nutrients, soil, microorganisms, and other potential pollutants from the fields to surface water or groundwater."

  5. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 11: Soil Conservation Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil conservation protects a valuable resource and reduces the off-farm direct impacts of sediment or the indirect impacts of nutrients or pesticides that may be attached to eroded soil particles. A good soil management program has three goals: to protect the soil from erosion by water or wind; to reduce runoff from the land into surface water; and to maintain or improve soil quality."

  6. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Overall Farmstead Ranking [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "This form is designed for collecting the average rankings from completed worksheets in one place for an overall comparison and interpretation."

  7. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: A Sample Post-Evaluation Survey [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "We would like your help in evaluating the Pennsylvania Farm?A?Syst program that recognizes farmsteads managed in an environmentally courteous way and promotes awareness of existing site conditions and management practices threatening the quality of groundwater and surface water."

  8. 23% Conservation Tillage Series: Economics of Conservation Tillage [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "There are many potential economic advantages for reducing the number of tillage operations for crop enterprises. These include: 1) lower fuel costs due to fewer trips over the field, 2) reducing the amount of tillage equipment needed, which results in lower machinery investment, 3) lower labor requirements, which reduce hired labor costs or free up operator time for other farm operations, 4) reducing soil loss from water and wind erosion, and 5) conserving soil moisture."

  9. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Farmstead Map [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A map can be a record of important features on the farmstead that can impact water quality. Drawing a farmstead map will make it easier to evaluate potential sources of pollution and to locate wells, septic tanks and absorption fields in the future when they need maintenance."

  10. 23% Effects of Soil Compaction [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil compaction is the reduction of soil volume due to external factors; this reduction lowers soil productivity and environmental quality. The threat of soil compaction is greater today than in the past because of the dramatic increase in the size of farm equipment. Therefore, producers must pay more attention to soil compaction than they have in the past. In this fact sheet we will discuss the effects of soil compaction and briefly identify ways to avoid or alleviate it."

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