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78 matches found for Brook Lawn Farm Market in Extension Publications

Results 41 - 50 of 78

  1. 23% Agronomy Facts 38D: A nutrient management approach for Pennsylvania: Exploring Performance Criteria [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The focus of nutrient management is rapidly evolving from optimizing agronomic production and economic returns of crop production to balancing farm production with environmental protection. Discovery of limiting factors, creativity in developing and delivering the needed materials or information, and confidence in the projected outcomes of improved soil fertility formed the basis for crop production and economic successes of the past. Scientists, farmers, educators, and industries must respond to the new expectations for environmental protection in many of the same ways."

  2. 23% Agronomy Facts 49: Successful Forage Crop Establishment
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Because of high costs, seeding forage crops is considered to be a "high stakes" farming operation. The days of spreading some seeds on the ground and hoping for nature to cooperate are past. Today, success is imperative. Forage producers must minimize risk as much as possible to ensure successful forage crop establishment. Here are some practices that can improve the success of forage crop seedings."

  3. 23% Agronomy Facts 60: Nutrient Management Planning - Overview [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Nutrient management traditionally has been concerned with optimizing the economic returns from nutrients used to produce a crop. More recently, nutrient management also has begun to address ways to minimize the negative impact of nutrients on the environment. Programs such as the Chesapeake Bay Program and the Nutrient Management Act in Pennsylvania have focused attention on improving nutrient management on Commonwealth farms."

  4. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Introduction [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The introduction includes a preliminary screening quiz that can help prioritize which Pennsylvania Farm?A?Syst worksheets to complete. It also includes a farmstead map worksheet, which is hand drawn by the evaluator to locate important features that may impact water quality. The worksheets can be used individually or together for a more complete evaluation."

  5. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Preliminary Screening Quiz [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Everything we do affects groundwater or surface water quality. Evaluation worksheets are available for farmstead management practices and site conditions. This preliminary screening quiz can help prioritize more detailed farmstead evaluations, which are available through the Pennsylvania Farm?A?Syst program."

  6. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 1: Water Well Condition and Construction [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "About 80% of Pennsylvania?s rural residents use groundwater to supply their drinking water and farmstead needs. Wells are designed to provide clean water. If they are not properly constructed or maintained, groundwater may become contaminated with bacteria, nitrates, and pesticides. These contaminants put family and livestock health at risk."

  7. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 2: Pesticide and Fertilizer Storage and Handling [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "When used properly, pesticides and fertilizers are effective crop management tools. However, these chemicals can endanger water quality and human health if they are not properly stored and handled. The chemicals can enter directly into the groundwater through wells or sinkholes at the farmstead or flow into surface water. When found in water supplies, pesticides normally are not present in high-enough concentrations to cause acute health effects. Instead, they typically occur at trace levels that may have effects after prolonged exposure."

  8. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 3: Household Wastewater Treatment System [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Nearly one-third of Pennsylvania residents rely on private household waste treatment systems. Maintenance of these systems is the responsibility of the home owner. Up to 50% of the solids retained in a septic system decompose while the remainder accumulate in the tank. Septic tanks need to be pumped every 3 to 5 years to prevent the solids from escaping the tank and clogging drain-fields. The frequency of the pumping depends on the size of the septic tank and the number of people it serves."

  9. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 4: Barnyard Conditions and Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The barnyard is often the first place to look for sources of sediment, bacteria, nitrogen, and phosphorus that can contaminate surface water and, in some cases, groundwater. Barnyards are busy places that can be difficult to manage. Mud and manure in a barnyard are not only a source of pollutants, but also sources of microbes that can cause animal health problems."

  10. 23% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 5: Milkhouse Waste Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Milking center wastewater usually is considered a dairy sanitation problem. If not carefully managed, however, dairy wastewater can contaminate surface water or groundwater. Milkhouse wastewater may contain paper towels, detergent, milk solids, fats, manure, and other organic materials that reduce oxygen levels in water as they decompose. Fish and other aquatic life need this oxygen to live. If milk is frequently poured down the milkhouse drain, milk fats can cause premature aging of a wastewater septic system due to clogging of the drain field."

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