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78 matches found for Brook Lawn Farm Market in Extension Publications

Results 31 - 40 of 78

  1. 34% Troubleshooting milk flavor problems [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Covers farm related areas that can contribute to milk flavor problems. Topics include classification of off-flavors, rancid flavor, farm oxidized flavor, feed flavor, unclean flavor, malty, high acid and putrid."

  2. 31% Agronomy Facts 54: Pennsylvania's Nutrient Management Act: Who Will Be Affected? [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "In the spring of 1993, the Pennsylvania legislature passed and the governor signed the Nutrient Management Act into law. Before this legislation was passed, problems with nutrient pollution were administered under the Clean Streams Law, which dealt only with surface waters. This existing law stated that if a farmer follows practices in the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) publication (Manure Manual), no special permits or approvals are required for manure utilization on farms. The Nutrient Management Act is the first law in Pennsylvania that requires regulatory oversight of nutrient plans on certain farms. This law oversight of nutrient plans on certain farms. This law will take effect on October 1, 1997. An important question is, who will be affected by this legislation?"

  3. 31% Avoiding Soil Compaction [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Twenty-first-century farm economics stimulate farmers to increase the size of their operations. To improve labor efficiency, farm equipment usually increases in size. Tractors, combines, forage harvesters, grain and forage wagons, manure spreaders, and lime trucks are all bigger than they used to be. Twenty years ago, for example, 2.5-ton box-type manure spreaders were common in Pennsylvania, whereas today liquid manure spreaders may weigh 20 or 30 tons. The increasing size of farm equipment may cause significant soil compaction that can negatively affect soil productivity as well as environmental quality. This fact sheet focuses on ways to avoid soil compaction."

  4. 25% Horse Facilities 5: Fence Planning for Horses [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Horse fence can be one of the most attractive features of a horse facility. But not all fence is suitable for horses. Fencing is a major capital investment that should be carefully planned before construction. Well-constructed and maintained fences enhance the aesthetics and value of a stable facility, which in turn complements marketing efforts. Poorly planned, haphazard, unsafe, or unmaintained fences will detract from a facility?s value. This 12-page publication presents information useful in planning fences for horse facilities. The emphasis is on sturdy,safe horse fence typically used in the eastern United States and Canada."

  5. 24% Agronomy Facts 63: Diagnosing Soil Compaction using a Penetrometer (soil compaction tester)
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil compaction is a serious concern for farmers in Pennsylvania. Soil compaction can easily reduce crop yields by 10 percent, and can lead to water and soil quality degradation due to increased runoff and soil structure destruction. The continuous consolidation of farms means that herds are growing, more forage is harvested per farm, more manure is being produced, larger equipment is used to spread manure and harvest and transport forages and grain, and the opportunity to tailor field operations to optimum soil conditions for traffic is decreasing. Compaction is therefore an issue that will likely increase in importance in the years to come."

  6. 24% Dairy Farm Feed Cost Control [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Feed costs represent between 50 and 60 percent of a dairy producer's expenses. To control on-farm feed costs, it is necessary to assess what forages and feeds currently are being fed and their current costs to the producer. This 32-page workbook, designed to be used with a computer spreadsheet program, can help you examine ways to control costs. This is a very specific program geared to dairy and farm management agents, dairy consultants, dairy nutritionists, veterinarians and dairy producers with good computer skills. To use the program, one needs either Windows 95 or 98 (Excel 97) or Mac OS 8.0 (Excel 98). "

  7. 23% Agronomy Facts 16: Nutrient Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The economics of nutrient management are clear. Manage plant nutrients for maximum economic benefit to the farmer. That is an easy concept to accept. Profit is the bottom line in farming, as in any business."

  8. 23% Agronomy Facts 18: Corn silage production and management
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Corn harvested for silage is an important feed crop on most Pennsylvania farms, where cropland often is limited. The crop provides livestock producers with a high-yielding, relatively consistent source of forage and the animals with a highly digestible and palatable feed. Corn silage produces more energy per acre than any other crop grown in Pennsylvania."

  9. 23% Agronomy Facts 30: Forage Quality in Perspective [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Fluctuations in milk prices, feed costs, and government programs are forcing dairy farmers to become more efficient with their farm operation. Since feed accounts for approximately one-half of the total cost of producing milk, and high quality forage optimizes the productivity of the animals, increasing the quality of forage available is one of the best methods of improving overall feeding efficiency. To effectively produce high quality forage, it is necessary to understand what forage quality is and to keep the factors influencing forage quality in perspective."

  10. 23% Agronomy Facts 38A: A nutrient management approach for Pennsylvania: Introduction to the concepts
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Nutrient management has taken on new meaning in recent times. Soil fertility traditionally dealt with supplying and managing nutrients to meet crop production requirements. The predictable response of a crop to the application of a deficient nutrient has been the focus. Ways of farming to optimize agronomic production and economic returns to crop production were developed to take advantage of these expected crop responses. Changes in the supply of plant nutrients for this purpose have been dramatic since the end of World War II."

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