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78 matches found for Brook Lawn Farm Market in Extension Publications

Results 21 - 30 of 78

  1. 40% Agricultural Alternatives: Veal Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Special-fed veal producers place 750,000 to 800,000 bobcalves, animals less than 7 days old, annually for vealproduction. Most of these calves are bull calves fromHolstein herds. There are approximately 1,400 veal producersin the United States, where production is concentrated inIndiana, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, andWisconsin. The largest demand for veal is in the Northeast,but most large cities have markets."

  2. 40% Begin Planning For Spring Labor Needs [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Dairy farm businesses that produce their own crops need to recognize that their labor and managment requirements increase dramatically during planting and harvest times. "

  3. 40% Blueprint for Success for Feeding Cattle in Pennsylvania [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    " <p>A joint initiative of:</p> Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences The Pennsylvania Beef Council This manual provides a summary of the management and animal factors that can increase the competitiveness, predictability, quality, and value to consumers of fed cattle in Pennsylvania. Recognizing that quality beef cattle may come in many forms and that market forces may not allow even the "best" animal to be profitable, the practices outlined here are intended to help reduce the cost of production, increase the value of the product to consumers, and reduce carcass discounts affecting meat quality."

  4. 36% Disease Management in Turf
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Disease in turfgrasses, as in other plants, develops from an interaction among a susceptible plant, a disease-producing organism (pathogen), and an environment favorable for disease development. Susceptible grasses and pathogens (usually fungi) are present in all lawns. In most cases, the pathogens exist in a dormant or saprophytic (feeding on dead or decaying substances) state and do not attack living plants. Diseases occur when environmental conditions (weather, management, and / or site conditions) become favorable for the build up of pathogen populations and / or cause an increase in the susceptibility of the plant. When this happens, turfgrass loss can occur."

  5. 36% Managing Turfgrass Diseases
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Disease in turfgrasses, as in other plants, develops from an interaction among a susceptible plant, a disease-producing organism (pathogen), and an environment favorable for disease development. Susceptible grasses and pathogens (usually fungi) are present in all lawns. In most cases, the pathogens exist in a dormant or saprophytic (feeding on dead or decaying substances) state and do not attack living plants. Diseases occur when environmental conditions (weather, management, and / or site conditions) become favorable for the build up of pathogen populations and / or cause an increase in the susceptibility of the plant. When this happens, turfgrass loss can occur."

  6. 34% Agronomy Facts 43: Four Steps to Rotational Grazing [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A well-managed pasture program can be the most economical way to provide forage to ruminant animals. On dairy farms where pasture makes up a significant portion of the forage program, feed costs may be reduced during the grazing season by $.50 to $1.00 a day per cow. However, careful planning and sound management are needed to optimize pasture utilization and animal performance. Knowing your animals, plants, and soils and being able to respond to their needs are skills that must be developed if rotational grazing is to be successful on your farm."

  7. 34% Pennsylvania Farm-A-Syst: Worksheet 6: Stream and Drainageway Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Water is one of our most important resources. In the past, it was advantageous to have a water source close to the farmstead. Today, numerous farms have a stream or drainageway cutting through heavily used pastures, exercise lots, or barnyards. As more cows are concentrated on an area, the potential increases for sediment, bacteria, nitrogen, and phosphorus to run off into these streams. However, if managed properly, on-farm streams can be useful for livestock watering and valuable for fish and wildlife habitat."

  8. 34% 2000 Dairy Farm Business Analysis [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This 24-page analysis provides summary information for various categories of dairy farms and is intended for more general use as an aid to decision making on Pennsylvania dairy farms. As such, the report should be useful to extension agents, individual dairy farmers, and a variety of business, government, and educational professionals."

  9. 34% Feeding the Newborn Dairy Calf [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Calf health, growth, and productivity rely heavily on nutrition and management practices. Every heifer calf born on a dairy farm represents an opportunity to maintain or increase herd size, to improve the herd genetically, or to improve economic returns to the farm. The objectives of raising the newborn calf to weaning age are optimizing growth and minimizing health problems. To accomplish these goals, it is necessary to understand the calf?s digestive and immune systems, her nutrient needs, and the feed options available to meet those needs."

  10. 34% Summary of the 1997 Pennsylvania Dairy Farm Practices Survey [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "This 10-page report summarizes the results of a 1997 mail survey of the principal operators of Pennsylvania dairy farms. It included questions about farm resources, cropping acreage, technology use, future production and technology plans, operator characteristics, and grazing practices."

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