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95 matches found for 1 in Extension Publications

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  1. Agronomy Series #134: An Early History of the Penn State University Agronomy Department [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "During the 1980's a distinctive feeling came over the United States. This was a desire to have a better awareness of our past history (our roots). This instigated a publication of a history of Penn State University (Bezilla, 1985) and a history of Penn State's College of Agriculture (Bezilla, 1987). This trend did not trickle down to the Penn State Agronomy Department level. Although this was the case, an earlier attempt was made by Professor Charles D. Jefferies of the Agronomy Department in November 1954. Jefferies' manuscript was never published; and as we all know, unpublished material is lost to the future. Because of this reason this publication is being generated in order that Jefferies' information is not lost. His manuscript is Chapter 2 of this publication. It is also hoped that this publication will stimulate someone to pick-up the challenge and update Jefferies' history to the present day."

  2. Agronomy Series #140: Metals Data for Pennsylvania Soils [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "In recent years, a great concern has developed in the effect of metals on the environment and human health. In particular, the threshold amounts of metals that impact the environment and health. As a part of this concern, a significant amount of research has been done on the background levels of these metals in the environment, in particular, in the soil. Many of these studies have not been published or are obscure and not readily available. To partially rectify this situation for Pennsylvania soils, this publication has been produced. This publication is a series of chapters of published and unpublished data, and little attempt has been made to synthesize the data from the various chapters, other than the comments given in the following section."

  3. Agronomy Series #142: Pennsylvania Soil Survey History [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "This publication celebrates the centennial (1899-1999) of the United States Cooperative Soil Survey Program and documents some historical aspects of the soil survey history of Pennsylvania. In 1986, Dr. Robert Cunningham et al. (1986), prepared a Penn State Agronomy Series (No. 90) publication which was a collection of papers by a number of authors on various aspects of the soil survey in Pennsylvania. That publication did not get wide distribution and is reproduced in this publication as Chapters 3-8. In addition, Chapter 2 has been added to document the initiation and development of the Penn State Soil Characterization Laboratory. The laboratory was the original focus of the Basic Soils Inventory Program within the Penn State Agronomy Department and has contributed greatly to the Cooperative Soil Survey Program in Pennsylvania. In Pennsylvania, the Cooperative Soil Survey Program includes the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), formally the USDA Soil Conservation Service (SCS), the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources (now the PADEP), the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, and the Penn State University College of Agricultural Sciences."

  4. Agronomy Series #143: Pennsylvania Soil Survey Biographies [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "This publication celebrates the centennial (1899-1999) of the United States Cooperative Soil Survey Program and documents some personal history and experience of individuals who have worked on soil survey in Pennsylvania. The initial collection of this information was done by Garland Lipscomb, Norm Churchill, and John Chibirka. These data were updated by most of the individual chapter authors. The information in each chapter has only been edited to correct errors and for formatting consistency. We hope that this publication will help archive this information for future soil scientists in the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It also compliments a previous attempt to document some soil survey history of Pennsylvania (Ciolkosz et al., 1998)."

  5. Agronomy Series #144: Pennsylvania Soil Survey The First 100 Years [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "This publication celebrates the centennial (1899-1999) of the United States Cooperative Soil Survey Program and documents some historical aspects of the soil survey history of Pennsylvania. We hope that this publication will help archive this information for future soil scientists in the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It also compliments two previous attempts to document some soil survey history of Pennsylvania (Ciolkosz et al., 1998, and Ciolkosz et al., 1999)."

  6. Agronomy Series #145: Pennsylvania State University Soil Characterization Laboratory Database System Documentation [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soils have been sampled and analyzed in Pennsylvania for characterization since 1954. The initial sampling was done by the USDA Soil Conservation Service (SCS) now known as the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Subsequent samplings have been done by the Penn State Soil Characterization Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the NRCS. Presently, 949 pedons (profiles) have been collected and analyzed. An account of the history of the sampling is given in Ciolkosz (1998). Initially the data (site, horizon, and laboratory) was available in hard copy printed form. Since the development of the computer, particularly the PC with large data capacities, the Pennsylvania analysis system and data have been computerized (see Ciolkosz, 2000; Ciolkosz and Thurman, 1992, 1994; Thurman et al., 1994). In order for a computer system to have longevity as it is modified and updated by computer programmers, the data system must be documented. Thus, the objective of this publication is to document the Penn State University Soil Characterization Laboratory Database System."

  7. Agronomy Series #146: Radiocarbon Data for Pennsylvania Soils [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Radiocarbon dating of material has given scientists a major tool to determine the age of materials that have incorporated carbon from the atmosphere into various organic as well as inorganic forms."

  8. Agronomy Series #147: Pennsylvania's Fragipans [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Fragipans are of great interest to soil science. Particularly Pennsylvania soil science because they are found in soils that cover about 30% of Pennsylvania?s land surface. Although very abundant, their distribution is not equal across the state."

  9. Agronomy Series #148: Major and Trace Elements in Southwestern Pennsylvania Soils [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Total elemental analysis was one of the earliest chemical analysis methods used to characterize the composition of soil material. With the advent of x-ray analysis emphasis shifted from total analysis to mineralogical analysis and the use of various extracting solutions to determine discreet components of the soil."

  10. Agronomy Series #149: The pH Base Saturation Relationships of Pennsylvania Subsoils [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Percent base saturation of the subsoil is used in Soil Taxonomy as the classification criterion for separating Alfisols from Ultisols, and Eutrudepts from Dystrudepts, as well as in other classification categories. When laboratory determinations are unavailable, soil scientists commonly use soil pH to estimate the percent base saturation. Predictions have not been reliable, however, because base saturation at given pH varies considerably from one soil to another."

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