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95 matches found for 1 in Extension Publications

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  1. Agronomy Facts 1: Soybean Production in Pennsylvania
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Many people believe soybeans are a new crop in Pennsylvania. Soybeans, however, have a long history of production in the state."

  2. Agronomy Facts 10: Management of Triazine-Resistant Pigweed and Lambsquarters [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The first reported population of triazine resistance in the United States occurred in the late 1960s in Washington State with common groundsel . Since that first discovery, more than 50 species of weeds scattered throughout the world have developed weed resistance problems. Triazine resistance, however, is by far the most serious weed resistance problem for farmers in the northeastern United States."

  3. Agronomy Facts 11: Inoculation of forage and grain legumes
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Legumes have the ability to form a mutually beneficial (symbiotic) relationship with certain soil bacteria of th type or "genus" . The benefit to the plant, and thus to the grower, is that these bacteria can take (fix) nitrogen from the air (in soil spaces) and make it available to the plant. The amount of nitrogen fixed can meet the needs of the plant and leave nitrogen in the soil for following crops."

  4. Agronomy Facts 12: Nitrogen fertilization of corn [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Nitrogen (N), an element that literally surrounds us, changes in form and chemistry almost continuously and moves from one location to another without our notice."

  5. Agronomy Facts 13: Managing phosphorus for crop production
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Phosphorus is a macronutrient that plays a number of important roles in plants. It is a component of nucleic acids, so it plays a vital role in plant reproduction, of which grain production is an important result. It is also critical in biological energy transfer processes that are vital for life and growth. Adequate phosphorus results in higher grain production, improved crop quality, greater stalk strength, increased root growth, and earlier crop maturity. For over one hundred years, phosphorus has been applied to crops as fertilizer - first as ground bone and now as some chemical reaction product of ground rock. Yet, for all that experience, its management cannot be taken for granted."

  6. Agronomy Facts 14: Managing potassium for crop production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A corn crop takes up nearly as much potassium (K) as it does nitrogen (N), yet management of each nutrient is entirely different. Because only the K in the harvested portion of a crop is removed from a field, managing K for corn silage is different than for grain."

  7. Agronomy Facts 16: Nutrient Management [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The economics of nutrient management are clear. Manage plant nutrients for maximum economic benefit to the farmer. That is an easy concept to accept. Profit is the bottom line in farming, as in any business."

  8. Agronomy Facts 17: Pre-sidedress Soil Nitrate Test for Corn [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A new approach to N soil testing whereby samples are taken during the growing season has been under study by researchers across the country, including a major effort in Pennsylvania. This test is called the Pre-sidedress Soil Nitrate Test (PSNT). The basis for this new N soil testing approach is taking soil samples just before sidedressing? after the spring wet period but before the period of major N demand by corn-and determining the nitrate-N available in the soil at that time. The results are then used to make sidedress N recommendations."

  9. Agronomy Facts 18: Corn silage production and management
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Corn harvested for silage is an important feed crop on most Pennsylvania farms, where cropland often is limited. The crop provides livestock producers with a high-yielding, relatively consistent source of forage and the animals with a highly digestible and palatable feed. Corn silage produces more energy per acre than any other crop grown in Pennsylvania."

  10. Agronomy Facts 19: Ryegrass
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Ryegrasses are the most widely grown cool-season grasses in the world. They have numerous desirable agronomic qualities. They establish rapidly, have a long growing season, are high yielding under favorable environments when supplied with adequate nutrients, possess high nutrient contents, and can be grazed and used for hay or silage. Ryegrasses grow best on fertile, well-drained soils but can be grown on soils where it is too wet at certain times of the year for satisfactory growth of other grasses."

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