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Penn State Cooperative Extension Publications

379 matches found for All Records in Extension Publications

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  1. Agronomy Facts 28: Tall Fescue [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Tall fescue ( Schreb.) is a deep-rooted, long-lived, sod-forming grass that spreads by short underground stems called rhizomes. In Pennsylvania it has been used primarily for conservation purposes but is well suited as hay, silage, or pasture. It is well adapted to the soil and weather conditions of Pennsylvania. It is especially well adapted to acid, wet soils of shale origin and produces more forage than other cool-season grasses on soils with a pH of less than 5.5."

  2. Agronomy Facts 29: Warm-season grasses
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Native, perennial warm-season grasses such as switchgrass ( L.) and big bluestem (Andropogon gerardi Vitman) grow primarily during the warm part of the summer. They produce well compared to cool-season grasses during the hot and dry weather of July and August, and on soils with low moisture holding capacity, low pH, and low phosphorus levels."

  3. Agronomy Facts 30: Forage Quality in Perspective [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Fluctuations in milk prices, feed costs, and government programs are forcing dairy farmers to become more efficient with their farm operation. Since feed accounts for approximately one-half of the total cost of producing milk, and high quality forage optimizes the productivity of the animals, increasing the quality of forage available is one of the best methods of improving overall feeding efficiency. To effectively produce high quality forage, it is necessary to understand what forage quality is and to keep the factors influencing forage quality in perspective."

  4. Agronomy Facts 31A: Soil fertility management for forage crops Pre-establishment [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil fertility management for forage crops is a continuous process that begins well before the forage crop is established. In the pre-establishment phase the soil conditions are adjusted to provide optimum soil fertility when the crop is established. At establishment the fertility program should deal with any last-minute small adjustments in soil fertility and any requirements for getting the plants established, such as a starter fertilizer. Finally, once the crop is established the fertility program focuses on maintaining good soil fertility levels for the life of the forage stand."

  5. Agronomy Facts 31B: Soil Fertility Management for Forage Crops Establishment
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Soil fertility management for forage crops is a continuous process that begins well before the forage crop is estab-lished. In the pre-establishment phase, the soil conditions are adjusted to provide optimum soil fertility when the crop is established. The fertility program during the establish-ment phase should deal with last minute, small adjust-ments in soil fertility and any requirements such as a starter fertilizer for getting the plants established. After the crop is established, the fertility program should focus on mainte-nance of good fertility levels in the soil for the life of the forage stand."

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