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Penn State Cooperative Extension Publications

379 matches found for All Records in Extension Publications

Results 306 - 310 of 379

  1. Prevention and control of foot problems in dairy cows [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Joint publication with Veterinary Science. Covers types of foot problems, bovine hoof, laminitis, digital dermatitis, hoof-care treatment, and preventive management. Contains 5-point lameness scoring scale. New material includes treatment protocols for digital dermatitis and common claw measurements."

  2. Prevention and control of nitrate toxicity in cattle [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Detailed information about nitrate toxicity's complexity, effects on animals, and guidelines for poisoning prevention. Also contains other general recommendations."

  3. Principles of Turfgrass Irrigation
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "A practical watering program embodies three basic concepts. Each concept may be set forth as a question: 1) How should water be applied? 2)How much water should be applied? 3) How often should water be applied? While the basic concepts of a good watering program may appear simple, in actual practice there are many and varied problems associated with the successful application of each."

  4. Procedures for Tattooing Market Hogs [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "The United States Department of Agriculture is requiring meat processors to maintain unique identity and the farm of origin for all show pigs purchased for slaughter. Hatfield Quality Meats has been a strong supporter of Pennsylvania?s county fairs and the Pennsylvania Farm Show and will continue to support the youth exhibitors at these events. In order to comply with the USDA directive, Hatfield now requires that all show hogs be uniquely tattooed before they are transported to the processing plant."

  5. Protein in Pastures: Can It Be Too High? [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "The nutrient quality of well-managed pasture is often higher than the same plant material harvested as silage or hay. This can present unique challenges in feeding dairy cows. A discussion of protein content in pastures and strategies to manage it is provided in this paper."

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