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Penn State Cooperative Extension Publications

379 matches found for All Records in Extension Publications

Results 21 - 25 of 379

  1. Agricultural Alternatives: Swine Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Technological change and vertical integration in the swineindustry have resulted in fewer farms producing recordamounts of pork. The number of operators involved in swineproduction in Pennsylvania fell from 20,000 at the beginningof 1981 to 3,456 in 1997. Pennsylvania remains animportant swine producer with market value of sales rankingit 12th in the country. Approximately 70 percent of Pennsylvania swine operations produce less than 100 head per year, and only 2.8 percent produce more than 1,000 head per year. While the trend in the swine industry continues towards larger farms, opportunities remain to make money by raising hogs in a part-time enterprise."

  2. Agricultural Alternatives: Veal Production [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Penn State - Dairy and Animal Science Publications

    "Special-fed veal producers place 750,000 to 800,000 bobcalves, animals less than 7 days old, annually for vealproduction. Most of these calves are bull calves fromHolstein herds. There are approximately 1,400 veal producersin the United States, where production is concentrated inIndiana, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, andWisconsin. The largest demand for veal is in the Northeast,but most large cities have markets."

  3. Agronomy Facts 10: Management of Triazine-Resistant Pigweed and Lambsquarters [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "The first reported population of triazine resistance in the United States occurred in the late 1960s in Washington State with common groundsel . Since that first discovery, more than 50 species of weeds scattered throughout the world have developed weed resistance problems. Triazine resistance, however, is by far the most serious weed resistance problem for farmers in the northeastern United States."

  4. Agronomy Facts 11: Inoculation of forage and grain legumes
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Legumes have the ability to form a mutually beneficial (symbiotic) relationship with certain soil bacteria of th type or "genus" . The benefit to the plant, and thus to the grower, is that these bacteria can take (fix) nitrogen from the air (in soil spaces) and make it available to the plant. The amount of nitrogen fixed can meet the needs of the plant and leave nitrogen in the soil for following crops."

  5. Agronomy Facts 12: Nitrogen fertilization of corn [pdf]Get Acrobat Reader
    Source: Department of Crop and Soil Sciences Publications

    "Nitrogen (N), an element that literally surrounds us, changes in form and chemistry almost continuously and moves from one location to another without our notice."

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